install a bitcoin cpuminer on ubuntu/debian · GitHub

/r/onions: Things That Make You Cry | Tor Onion Routing Hidden Services

The Best Parts of the Anonymous Internet | Tor Onion Routing Hidden Services | .onions
[link]

Ethereum on ARM. Geth and Parity clients update. Status.im, IPFS and Swarm packages. Raiden Network and Trinity client installers.

EthArmbian [1] is a custom Linux image for the NanoPC-T4 ARM SoC [2] that runs Geth or Parity Ethereum clients as a boot service and automatically turns the device into a full Ethereum node.
Once powered up, the image takes care of all steps, from setting up the environment to running the Ethereum client and synchronizing the blockchain.
Edit: Images links are now Ready for Constantinople and Petersburg Hardforks. You can update Geth to 1.8.22 and Parity to 2.2.9 from these images by running:
update-ethereum
This is a new release of the EthArmbian image for the NanoPC-T4 ARM board. Ethereum is evolving quickly so it is time to include some other interesting pieces of the ecosystem. Changelog:

Download links

Armbian_5.74_Nanopct4_Ubuntu_bionic_default_4.4.172-1-geth.img.zip
Armbian_5.74_Nanopct4_Ubuntu_bionic_default_4.4.172-1-parity.img.zip
Note: The only difference between both images is the default client that runs at boot time. You can switch between Geth or Parity at anytime.
For further info regarding installation and usage please visit Github README [1]

Status.im, IPFS and Swarm

Status [5] is a decentralized messaging & browsing app (using the Whisper protocol). And as any P2P system, it needs… peers. So if you want to support it, status is now included as a systemd service, configured in whisper and mailserver mode.
You need to start it manually as it doesn’t run by default:
sudo systemctl start status.im
And, if you want it to get started on boot you need:
sudo systemctl enable status.im
Configuration options are located in /etc/ethereum/status.im.json.
Why run a Status node? (from their FAQ):
Currently, we don’t provide any incentives for running Status Nodes. We are working hard to solve this problem. Our intent is to increase the size of the Whisper network, thereby improving how “decentralized” and safe our platform is.
Another reason is privacy. In the current setup, nodes that are running as Mail Servers are trusted. This means that such a node can communicate directly with the Status app using a p2p connection and some metadata might leak. If one wants to avoid that, the best option is to run a Mail Server on your own and configure it in the Status app.
Another important piece of the so called web 3 is decentralized storage. The most mature option available is IPFS [6] which is now included as a systemd service as well. You need to start it manually as it doesn’t run for default:
sudo systemctl start ipfs
If you want IPFS to get started on boot you need to enable it by running:
sudo systemctl enable ipfs
You can tweak config options in /home/ethereum/.ipfs/config file (particularly, you may want to adjust the StorageMax parameter).
Swarm [7] (Ethereum decentralized storage solution) is available as a binary. You may want to take a look at the official docs to start testing it.
You can run these clients along with Geth or Parity client with no performance issues.

Raiden and Trinity

As you may know, Raiden Network [8] is a Layer 2 scalability solution (similar to Bitcoin's Lightning Network). Trinity [9] is a new Ethereum client developed entirely in Python (and already working on the beacon chain).
You can install both clients by running its corresponding bash script. Take into account that both are in alpha stage so expect some trouble and give back feedback to developers, if possible. They are not properly packaged yet so the script installs them directly from Github (it takes a while).
Installation: Type (as ethereum user):
install-trinity
install-raiden
You can now run "trinity" or "raiden" commands.
Note on Trinity: If you experience this issue: “trinity: error: Timed out waiting for database start”, try to increase wait_for_ipc() “timeout” value in /uslocal/lib/python3.6/dist-packages/trinity/utils/ipc.py [10]

Ethereum nodes FUD

We’ve been seeing lately a lot of misinformation about Ethereum blockchain size and other kind of FUD.
Stick to the facts. With Parity, it just takes several hours to get a full node up and running and you need about 140 GB of SSD disk size (2-3 days with Geth and 150GB of disk size). So, you could run a full node for several months even with a 256GB SSD unit. Don’t listen to this kind of nonsense. Plain and simple: they are wrong.
This "guy" knows [11]

References

[1] https://github.com/diglos/userpatches
[2] https://www.friendlyarm.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=225
[3] https://github.com/ethereum/go-ethereum/releases/tag/v1.8.21
[4] https://github.com/paritytech/parity-ethereum/releases/tag/v2.2.7
[5] https://status.im/
[6] https://ipfs.io/
[7] https://swarm-guide.readthedocs.io/en/latest/introduction.html
[8] https://raiden.network/
[9] https://trinity.ethereum.org/
[10] https://github.com/ethereum/trinity/issues/182
https://github.com/ethereum/trinity/pull/192/commits/e19326689cbb08fd81c1827a7a3ab41200bbbeff
[11] https://twitter.com/ethnodesize
submitted by diglos76 to ethereum [link] [comments]

Is my model overkill?

Hi everyone,
Newbie here. Right now, I just want to pay for a VPN service, but I imagine I will use BTC to pay for more things as I get more familiar with the currency.
For privacy, I am planning to buy BTC from a Bitcoin ATM in town. My problems begin with wallets. I understand that it is best to run your own full node for privacy, so I am going to run a full node bitcoin core installed on Tails OS to route it through TOR. But I have no experience with Debian, so if you happen to know a guide on doing this (besides the official one) would be most appreciated.
My question is, if I am only going to make a single payment for now, do I have to run my node all the time? Could I just unplug the USB the wallet is on and make it a """cold""" storage? Or would there be associated problems? Should I use a mixer after buying Bitcoin from an ATM? Is my plan stupid and there is a much easier way that offers a comparable privacy level?
Please let me know! My head is splitting from reading jargony articles, so I welcome any suggestions.
submitted by pharma_daddy to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Vertnode - An automated solution for installing Vertcoin node(s) on Single Board Computers

Hello Vertcoin Community,
Eager to contribute to the Vertcoin Community I began creating step by step walkthrough guides on how to get a Vertcoin node up and running on a Raspberry Pi, Raspberry Pi Zero and Intel NUC. Along with information to get a Vertcoin node up and running was also optional steps to install p2pool-vtc.
I decided that while this step by step guide might be helpful to a few, a setup script may prove to be useful to a wider range of people. I have this script to a point where I think it may be productive to share with a bigger audience, for those who are brave and have this hardware sitting around or like to tinker with projects; I invite you to test this setup script if you are interested, if you run into errors any sort of verbose console output of the error proves to be extremely helpful in troubleshooting.
The script was designed to produce a “headless” server... meaning we will not be using a GUI to configure Vertcoin or check to see how things are running. In fact, once the server is set up, you will only interact with it using command line calls over SSH. The idea is to have this full node be simple, low-power, with optimized memory usage and something that “just runs” in your basement, closet, etc.
Why run a headless node on a Single Board Computer?
The idea is to have this full node be simple, low-power, with optimized memory usage and something that “just runs” in your basement, closet, etc.
Required: USB Flash Drive 6GB - 32GB
Please note that the script was designed for Single Board Computers first and looks for an accessible USB Flash Drive to use for storing the blockchain and swap file, as constant writing to a microSD can degrade the health of the microSD.
Supports

Hardware

All of the hardware listed above is hardware that I have personally tested / am testing on myself. The plan is to continue expanding my arsenal of single board computers and continue to add support for more hardware to ensure as much compatibility as possible.
Functionality
It is worth noting that LIT can be ran with multiple configurations, the ones displayed in the Post Installation Report reflect values that run LIT with the Vertcoin Mainnet. Please be aware that the Vertcoin Testnet chain has not been mined 100% of the time in the past, if you make transactions on the Vertcoin testnet that do not go through it is likely because the chain has stopped being mined.
BE CAREFUL WITH YOUR COINS, ONLY TEST WITH WHAT YOU ARE OKAY WITH LOSING IF YOU USE THE MAINNET.

Vertcoin Testnet Coins

https://tvtc.blkidx.org/faucet/
I've included some documentation on LIT I created which includes information I found to be useful: https://github.com/e-corp-sam-sepiol/vertnode/blob/mastedocs/lit.md
Please visit the mit-dci/lit github repository for the most up to date information on lit: https://github.com/mit-dci/lit

Vertnode | Automated Vertcoin Node Installation Script

https://github.com/e-corp-sam-sepiol/vertnode

Recommended: Use Etcher to install the chosen OS to your microSD card / USB flash drive.

If you intend on installing Ubuntu Server 16.04 to your Intel NUC please use Etcher to install the .iso to your USB flash drive.
https://etcher.io/
PLEASE NOTE THIS SCRIPT MAY GIVE AN ERROR. THIS IS THE NATURE OF TESTING. PLEASE REPORT YOUR ERRORS IF YOU WANT THEM TO BE FIXED/RESOLVED. THANK YOU FOR BETTERING THE DEVELOPMENT OF THIS SCRIPT.

Ubuntu Server 16.04 Setup Details

You can use different clients to ssh into your node. One option is using PuTTY or Git Bash on Windows which is included in the desktop version of Git. If you are using Linux you can simply open a new terminal window and ssh to the IP address of your node (hardware you intend installing the Vertcoin node on).
You will need to know the IP address of your node, this can be found on your router page.
ssh 192.168.1.5 -l pi For example, this command uses ssh to login to 192.168.1.5 using the -l login name of pi. The IP address of your node will likely be different for you, in this example I am logging into a Raspberry Pi which has a default login name of pi.
A brief list of commands that can be used to check on the Vertcoin node status:
vertcoin-cli getblockchaininfo | Grab information about your blockchain
vertcoin-cli getblockcount | Grab the current count of blocks on your node
vertcoin-cli getconnectioncount | Grab the current count of connections to your node. A number of connections larger than 8 means that you have incoming connections to your node. The default settings are to make 8 outgoing connections. If you want incoming connections please port forward your Raspberry Pi in your Router settings page.
vertcoin-cli getpeerinfo | Grab the information about the peers you have connected to / are connected to
vertcoin-cli getnettotals | Grab network data, how much downloaded/upload displayed in bytes
tail -f ~/.vertcoin/debug.log | Output the latest lines in the Vertcoin debug.log to see verbose information about the Vertcoin daemon (ctrl+c to stop)
Thank you to all who have helped me and inspired me thus far, @b17z, @jamesl22, @vertcoinmarketingteam, @canen, @flakfired, @etang600, @BDF, @tucker178, @Xer0
This work is dedicated to the users of Vertcoin, thank you for making this possible.
7/20/2018 Thank you @CommodoreAmiga for the incredibly generous tip <3
You can reach me @Sam Sepiol#3396 on the Vertcoin Discord, here on reddit or @ [email protected]
submitted by ecorp-sam-sepiol to vertcoin [link] [comments]

Encryption is No Longer an Option - Ways to Restore Your Natural Right to Privacy

Encryption is No Longer an Option
“If the State’s going to move against you, it’s going to move against you. Now, that doesn’t mean you need to be reckless of course. I’m awful careful you guys, and even my degree of care and control ultimately won’t be enough if they get mad enough. There will always be something…I’ve done what I hope is the best any man can do. So…I hope when they finally do get me, it’s obvious that they just made it up. I don’t go out of my way to make it easy.” – Cody Wilson
For all Anarchists our love for freedom unites us and guides us. I recently had a conversation with a mutual friend that Cody and I have in common and he stated something very insightful:
CryptoAnarchy is like the Lord of the Rings. You have to cooperate with people that you don’t know where they are or what they’re up to. That is, you just know that we are all figuring out at the same time on how to take down Sauron.
Anarchy is guided by the natural instinct for self-preservation. You can trust that others are also actively working in keeping us all free.
For us all to move into more synergistic cooperation we need more motivation. Nothing is more motivating than our movement away from an impending harmful evil. The persecution that Cody Wilson has gone through since he started his activism is testament to the evil that awaits the entire world if we do not fight against the impending digital global prison. Just note how easy it was to find Cody. Government indoctrinated brownshirts and surveillance are everywhere.
As Jeff recently said in London, “CryptoAnarchy is about the cryptography.” Cryptocurrency is only possible due to the privacy offered by cryptography. A true cryptocurrency is completely fungible, anonymous, and private. Blockchains without on-chain privacy set by default, are dangerous and offer nothing other than accurate surveillance.
That is, the moment you destroy a coin’s fungibility you corrupt its incentive structure. This is because you would then have two classes of the same coin within a transparent blockchain; these are coins that are “tainted” or “untainted” according to government. This differentiation created by blockchain surveillance leads “tainted” coins to be priced differently from “untainted” coins. Once this happens you destroy the functionality of a currency as a medium of exchange.
Imagine the headache of retailers in having to tell clients that they only accept “untainted” bitcoins. The result of not having a fungible medium of exchange is that you destroy the incentive structure of the network effect of a coin. You simply end up with a useless and unwanted network where value is supposed to be exchanged. If the units within the medium of exchange do not themselves contain the same value in the market, the utility of the network effect is destroyed.
The economic ramifications of non-fungible SurveillanceCoins are so bad that they make fiat currencies of central banks look good. In spite of their centralized proof of government violence, fiat currencies are more fungible and private than a coin based on a transparent blockchain.
For much time within crypto we would call the majority of blockchains as “pseudo-anonymous” because we knew the importance of fungibility. At that time blockchain analysis had not caught up to our technology. Now companies like Elliptic and Chainalysis have made the vast majority of blockchains in the market transparent.
Sadly, most blockchain communities have not upgraded their privacy to be on chain by default- making them transparent. However, some more intelligent communities- like Monero- are at the same time growing because they understand the importance of fungibility.
Please understand that we at TDV are ahead of the pack in understanding where all of this is going. The vast majority of people won’t tell you these harsh truths about the Blockchain space, but it is our moral imperative to inform you as best as possible.
As time goes on, we will continue to champion actual fungible CryptoCurrencies and we will continue to make clear distinctions between a SurveillanceCoin and an actual CryptoCurrency.
It is important that we take a step back from CryptoCurrencies and focus on just cryptography. You can never be too careful. Throughout our groups we have had various requests as to how to better use different wallets.
Yes, we will cover all of that in our upcoming surprise for our community, but what is most important is that you protect yourself at the network layer, your identity, and your communication.
CryptoAnarchy began way before Bitcoin. If you want to know what will be happening to CryptoCurrencies and CryptoAnarchy in the near future, you need to read Timothy C. May’s 1992 prophetic Crypto Anarchist Manifesto.
On reading this, you cannot afford to be idle regarding your privacy. This is not the time for you to easily give up what is most personal about you; your thoughts and identity. Your privacy is sacred. You need to protect your privacy as much as possible at all times. Don’t give into the defeatist notions of future technology being capable of deanonymizing any cryptography you currently use. Your goal is to be private right now in the present moment.
You are up against a global digital tyranny- that is already here!
...Cazes was not a US citizen and the Alphabay servers and Cazes were not caught on US soil. Just because crimes involving narcotic deals took place in America, weirdly enough, the US seemingly has the right above anyone to seize Cazes’ property, and charge him and his accomplices in US trials...
Use Secure Hardware That Protects You
Be paranoid. Stay paranoid. The more paranoid you are the better. Currently the five eyes are moving to strip away all of your privacy. They are on the direct path to force all companies to hand over back doors to software and hardware encryption.
This is a new breach on individual rights. The backdoors in hardware have existed since the 90’s via Trusted Computing and Digital Rights Management (DRM). The difference is that now companies will be fined and forced by governments (all governments) to open up backdoors for the surveillance of all- in both software and hardware. Australia is leading the charge since they are the only ones within the five eyes without a Bill of Rights.
If you really want to be secure, then you need to start with your hardware. Almost all laptops and hardware chips are engineered with unsafe software. These chips can transmit voice, your networking, pictures, and even video signals. Many of these chips are used to install spyware, malware and viruses.
The market has provided us with two easy plug-and-play hardware solutions.
Purism is a CryptoAnarchist company dedicated in offering us the safest computers in the market. Purism’s line of Librem Laptops is manufactured with software and hardware built from the ground up, where you can be at ease knowing there are no back doors built within it. They work with hardware component suppliers and the Free software community in making hardware that respects and protects your security. Every chip is individually selected with emphasis on respecting freedom. (Purism Librem laptops have built in Kill-Switches for your microphone/camera and wireless/Bluetooth)
All of the necessary components that you would have to bundle up together- by yourself- from a community vetted place like Prism-Break are already installed and ready to go within Librem laptops. Even if you were to install all of the necessary open-source encrypted alternatives, you still would not be able to 100% trust your current computer’s hardware.
Purism Librem laptops come with their own PureOS (operating system). Purism also offers compatibility with Qubes OS in a flash-drive (similar to Tails) to give you even another layer of protection on top of PureOS. Qubes OS is what Edward Snowden uses. PureOs is a derivative of Debian GNU/Linux. Qubes is free and open-source software (FOSS).
Purism is currently having a pre-sale for their first phone the Librem 5.
Another popular safe hardware computer market alternative is ORWL. ORWL is a desktop PC. ORWL comes with a physical encryption key that looks like a keychain. If anyone ever tries to physically tamper with the ORWL computer, sensors will automatically detect the intrusion and erase everything. ORWL comes with the operating system options of Qubes OS, Ubuntu, or Windows.
ORWL does not receive payment for their products in Crypto. Purism on the other hand accepts payment in BitcoinCore, BitcoinCash, Litecoin, Ethereum, Decred, Dogecoin, and Monero.
ORWL is a good alternative for more computer savvy people. If you are not the most competent person with computers, Purism is the way to go. With Purism everything is ready to go.
Once you get good hardware don’t use this new computer for anything other than crypto stuff. That is, don’t use it with anything that requires your slave identity. Don’t access social media with your name, don’t access bank accounts, don’t access crypto exchanges, don’t access old email accounts, definitely don’t access anything that requires KYC and AML, and don’t access any identifying log-in that is related to any of your previous internet identities. Create new identities from scratch for this new computer.
Watch this video and learn about the basics on operational security (OPSEC). Take everything written here, and spoken at the conference in the video above, as barely the preliminary basic requirements of OPSEC. You should definitely continue your own research upon getting your new secure hardware computer.
(It would be best if you purchased this computer using crypto- Monero preferably- and have it mailed to a mailing address not associated with any of your addresses; think along the lines of JJ Luna).
Encrypt Your Communication
“This generation being born now... is the last free generation.You are born and either immediately or within say a year you are known globally. Your identity in one form or another –coming as a result of your idiotic parents plastering your name and photos all over Facebook or as a result of insurance applications or passport applications– is known to all major world powers.” – Julian Assange
The vast majority of our community uses Facebook. Unfortunately its network effect is something we all rely on to some degree. Fortunately for us a friend of our community created FaceMask. Through FaceMask we can still use Facebook in complete privacy- away from Zuckerberg's prying eyes. In the near future we will implement FaceMask into our TDV groups as optional privacy for our posts. We will provide our subscribers with the keys necessary to encrypt and decrypt the messages and posts. Again, this is optional. For now please go to the link above and familiarize yourself with Facemask and its technology.
Don’t use Google. If you are using Google start transitioning out of it. If you are using Gmail, start moving towards encrypted services like ProtonMail or TutaNota. They both offer a free option, try them both out and choose your favorite. Use two factor authentication on everything that requires you to log-in that allows for the use of two factor authentication. Most people use Google Authenticator and Authy. I personally prefer the open source options of FreeOTP & andOTP. Use the one that you find best suited for you. Using one is paramount for security nowadays.
If you are one that uses Google Docs with your team, move instead to CryptPad. The more you use CryptPad the more addicting it becomes; your collaborated work is encrypted and private. You no longer will have to worry about knowing that Google is capturing all of your collaborated work. You can also start using CryptPad for free.
If you are using Skype for conference calls, switch to Jitsi. Jitsi is even easier to use than Skype. If you use their MeetJitsi feature you can just access the encrypted conferencing via any browser by agreeing with your other party on the same predetermined passphrase.
Don’t use regular text messaging. Rather, use Signal, Wickr, Keybase, or Telegram.
Use a VPN
A VPN (virtual private network) encrypts all of your traffic via a private network of servers scattered throughout the world. This process anonymizes your IP address. Make sure you don’t use your identity when using a VPN- that would just give away your identity as being connected with the VPN servers you are using.
Many VPN providers register your activity and can hand it over to government if they so demand it. They break their promises to their clients all the time. Let’s minimize risk by staying away from the most draconian of jurisdictions.
To lessen this issue, do not ever use a VPN that is based out of any of the 5 eyes:
-United Kingdom
-United States
-Australia
-Canada
-New Zealand
Furthermore, avoid VPNs based out of the following nine countries, that combined with the first 5 make up the 14 eyes:
-Denmark
-France
-The Netherlands
-Norway
-Germany
-Belgium
-Italy
-Spain
-Sweden
No VPN is a complete safeguard. In spite of this, it is still best to use one. We recommend you ONLY use it (turn it on) when doing crypto-related things and only crypto-related things on your regular computer. For your new encrypted hardware computer have it on at all times. If you use it to access an actual bank account, or another personal account (including crypto accounts that require your personal information; read coinbase, or any other exchange) — then, again, the use of the VPN use becomes trite.
Here are six VPN options outside of the 14 eyes that we recommend you research further and use at your own discretion:
NordVPN (Panama)
CyberGhost (Romania)
HideMe (Malaysia)
Astrill (Seychelles)
TrustZone (Seychelles)
iVPN (Gibralter)
Like all things in the market now, some VPNs take Crypto as payment—others do not. It is best if you bought your VPN with crypto not not your credit card, debit card, or paypal.
TOR (The Onion Router)
The Onion Router is software that you use as a browser. It protects you by bouncing your communications around a distributed network- throughout the world- of relays runned by volunteers. This prevents evesdroppers from learning your IP address, spying on you, and disclosing your physical location. TOR also allows you to access sites that are blocked.
You can use TOR and a VPN simultaneously. If you are new to all of this, it is best that you just learn how to use the features of your new computer coupled with your preferred VPN. The use of TOR is a little more complicated and you will have to configure it according the specifications of your preferred VPN. As you begin this process, as long as you are using your VPN correctly you should be fine.
Fincen and crypto-exchanges
ShapeShift is now stuck having to require its users to deanonymize their transactions in order to meet KYC and AML requirements; it pretty clear that they got ShapeShift under the Bank Secrecy Act. Stay away from Shapeshift (sorry @erikvorhees).
“Very disappointed that @ShapeShift_io is implementing KYC. Just goes to show that any centralized entity will be pushed in that direction, which is why LN, atomic swaps and Decentralized Exchanges are the only way to resist a surveillance economics.” - Andreas Antonopoulos
As the news of ShapeShift broke out, the market was quick to answer with alternatives. Among the private centric alternatives to ShapeShift we find Godex, ChangeHero, XMR.TO, and Bisq.
ChangeHero and Godex are pretty much the same business concept as ShapeShift. The only difference is that they do not require you to become transparent. XMR.TO allows you to make BTC payments by using Monero.
That is, by using Monero together with XMR.TO you can pay any BTC address in the world while protecting your privacy.
Bisq is the Best Option
The most important to focus on is Bisq. Bisq is a complete decentralized exchange. Bisq is instantly accessible- there is no need for registration or approval from a central authority. The system is decentralized peer-to-peer and trading cannot be stopped or censored.
Bisq is safe. Unlike MtGox and the rest of centralized exchanges, Bisq never holds your funds. Bisq provides a system of decentralized arbitration with security deposits that protect traders. The privacy is set where no one except trading partners exchange personal identifying information. All personal data is stored locally.
All communication on Bisq is end-to-end encrypted routed over Tor. Upon downloading and running Bisq TOR runs on Bisq automatically. Every aspect of the development of Bisq is open source.
Bisq is easy to use. If you are accustomed to centralized exchanges, you might find Bisq a little different. If you want anonymity and privacy, this is the best crypto exchange we have. Tell your friends about Bisq. Just download Bisq and take it for a test drive, you will feel fresh freedom of entering into peaceful voluntary exchange with your fellow man. Do it, it’s good for the soul.
On Cody
I would like to personally thank all of our subscribers for generously donating to Defense Distributed on our last issue. At the moment of us putting out our last newsletter, DefDist had raised less than 100k USD. After our Newsletter got out, his donations went past 300k USD.
Thank you very much for helping out our friends in their continual fight for freedom!
Please pray for Cody, his friends, and his family.
I once asked Cody what his background was- because idk his mannerisms have always been interesting to me. He answered; “I am Romani- I am a Gypsy.”
Thank you for helping out our Gypsy friend and his band of rebels! They will very much be using your generous donations now that things got much more serious.
If you haven’t donated, please consider donating. Blessings!
By Rafael LaVerde
Excerpt taken from The Dollar Vigilante September 2018 Issue
https://dollarvigilante.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/TDV-September-2018-Issue.pdf
submitted by 2012ronpaul2012 to C_S_T [link] [comments]

Encryption is No Longer an Option - Ways to Restore Your Natural Right to Privacy

Encryption is No Longer an Option
“If the State’s going to move against you, it’s going to move against you. Now, that doesn’t mean you need to be reckless of course. I’m awful careful you guys, and even my degree of care and control ultimately won’t be enough if they get mad enough. There will always be something…I’ve done what I hope is the best any man can do. So…I hope when they finally do get me, it’s obvious that they just made it up. I don’t go out of my way to make it easy.” – Cody Wilson
For all Anarchists our love for freedom unites us and guides us. I recently had a conversation with a mutual friend that Cody and I have in common and he stated something very insightful:
CryptoAnarchy is like the Lord of the Rings. You have to cooperate with people that you don’t know where they are or what they’re up to. That is, you just know that we are all figuring out at the same time on how to take down Sauron.
Anarchy is guided by the natural instinct for self-preservation. You can trust that others are also actively working in keeping us all free.
For us all to move into more synergistic cooperation we need more motivation. Nothing is more motivating than our movement away from an impending harmful evil. The persecution that Cody Wilson has gone through since he started his activism is testament to the evil that awaits the entire world if we do not fight against the impending digital global prison. Just note how easy it was to find Cody. Government indoctrinated brownshirts and surveillance are everywhere.
As Jeff recently said in London, “CryptoAnarchy is about the cryptography.” Cryptocurrency is only possible due to the privacy offered by cryptography. A true cryptocurrency is completely fungible, anonymous, and private. Blockchains without on-chain privacy set by default, are dangerous and offer nothing other than accurate surveillance.
That is, the moment you destroy a coin’s fungibility you corrupt its incentive structure. This is because you would then have two classes of the same coin within a transparent blockchain; these are coins that are “tainted” or “untainted” according to government. This differentiation created by blockchain surveillance leads “tainted” coins to be priced differently from “untainted” coins. Once this happens you destroy the functionality of a currency as a medium of exchange.
Imagine the headache of retailers in having to tell clients that they only accept “untainted” bitcoins. The result of not having a fungible medium of exchange is that you destroy the incentive structure of the network effect of a coin. You simply end up with a useless and unwanted network where value is supposed to be exchanged. If the units within the medium of exchange do not themselves contain the same value in the market, the utility of the network effect is destroyed.
The economic ramifications of non-fungible SurveillanceCoins are so bad that they make fiat currencies of central banks look good. In spite of their centralized proof of government violence, fiat currencies are more fungible and private than a coin based on a transparent blockchain.
For much time within crypto we would call the majority of blockchains as “pseudo-anonymous” because we knew the importance of fungibility. At that time blockchain analysis had not caught up to our technology. Now companies like Elliptic and Chainalysis have made the vast majority of blockchains in the market transparent.
Sadly, most blockchain communities have not upgraded their privacy to be on chain by default- making them transparent. However, some more intelligent communities- like Monero- are at the same time growing because they understand the importance of fungibility.
Please understand that we at TDV are ahead of the pack in understanding where all of this is going. The vast majority of people won’t tell you these harsh truths about the Blockchain space, but it is our moral imperative to inform you as best as possible.
As time goes on, we will continue to champion actual fungible CryptoCurrencies and we will continue to make clear distinctions between a SurveillanceCoin and an actual CryptoCurrency.
It is important that we take a step back from CryptoCurrencies and focus on just cryptography. You can never be too careful. Throughout our groups we have had various requests as to how to better use different wallets.
Yes, we will cover all of that in our upcoming surprise for our community, but what is most important is that you protect yourself at the network layer, your identity, and your communication.
CryptoAnarchy began way before Bitcoin. If you want to know what will be happening to CryptoCurrencies and CryptoAnarchy in the near future, you need to read Timothy C. May’s 1992 prophetic Crypto Anarchist Manifesto.
On reading this, you cannot afford to be idle regarding your privacy. This is not the time for you to easily give up what is most personal about you; your thoughts and identity. Your privacy is sacred. You need to protect your privacy as much as possible at all times. Don’t give into the defeatist notions of future technology being capable of deanonymizing any cryptography you currently use. Your goal is to be private right now in the present moment.
You are up against a global digital tyranny- that is already here!
...Cazes was not a US citizen and the Alphabay servers and Cazes were not caught on US soil. Just because crimes involving narcotic deals took place in America, weirdly enough, the US seemingly has the right above anyone to seize Cazes’ property, and charge him and his accomplices in US trials...
Use Secure Hardware That Protects You
Be paranoid. Stay paranoid. The more paranoid you are the better. Currently the five eyes are moving to strip away all of your privacy. They are on the direct path to force all companies to hand over back doors to software and hardware encryption.
This is a new breach on individual rights. The backdoors in hardware have existed since the 90’s via Trusted Computing and Digital Rights Management (DRM). The difference is that now companies will be fined and forced by governments (all governments) to open up backdoors for the surveillance of all- in both software and hardware. Australia is leading the charge since they are the only ones within the five eyes without a Bill of Rights.
If you really want to be secure, then you need to start with your hardware. Almost all laptops and hardware chips are engineered with unsafe software. These chips can transmit voice, your networking, pictures, and even video signals. Many of these chips are used to install spyware, malware and viruses.
The market has provided us with two easy plug-and-play hardware solutions.
Purism is a CryptoAnarchist company dedicated in offering us the safest computers in the market. Purism’s line of Librem Laptops is manufactured with software and hardware built from the ground up, where you can be at ease knowing there are no back doors built within it. They work with hardware component suppliers and the Free software community in making hardware that respects and protects your security. Every chip is individually selected with emphasis on respecting freedom. (Purism Librem laptops have built in Kill-Switches for your microphone/camera and wireless/Bluetooth)
All of the necessary components that you would have to bundle up together- by yourself- from a community vetted place like Prism-Break are already installed and ready to go within Librem laptops. Even if you were to install all of the necessary open-source encrypted alternatives, you still would not be able to 100% trust your current computer’s hardware.
Purism Librem laptops come with their own PureOS (operating system). Purism also offers compatibility with Qubes OS in a flash-drive (similar to Tails) to give you even another layer of protection on top of PureOS. Qubes OS is what Edward Snowden uses. PureOs is a derivative of Debian GNU/Linux. Qubes is free and open-source software (FOSS).
Purism is currently having a pre-sale for their first phone the Librem 5.
Another popular safe hardware computer market alternative is ORWL. ORWL is a desktop PC. ORWL comes with a physical encryption key that looks like a keychain. If anyone ever tries to physically tamper with the ORWL computer, sensors will automatically detect the intrusion and erase everything. ORWL comes with the operating system options of Qubes OS, Ubuntu, or Windows.
ORWL does not receive payment for their products in Crypto. Purism on the other hand accepts payment in BitcoinCore, BitcoinCash, Litecoin, Ethereum, Decred, Dogecoin, and Monero.
ORWL is a good alternative for more computer savvy people. If you are not the most competent person with computers, Purism is the way to go. With Purism everything is ready to go.
Once you get good hardware don’t use this new computer for anything other than crypto stuff. That is, don’t use it with anything that requires your slave identity. Don’t access social media with your name, don’t access bank accounts, don’t access crypto exchanges, don’t access old email accounts, definitely don’t access anything that requires KYC and AML, and don’t access any identifying log-in that is related to any of your previous internet identities. Create new identities from scratch for this new computer.
Watch this video and learn about the basics on operational security (OPSEC). Take everything written here, and spoken at the conference in the video above, as barely the preliminary basic requirements of OPSEC. You should definitely continue your own research upon getting your new secure hardware computer.
(It would be best if you purchased this computer using crypto- Monero preferably- and have it mailed to a mailing address not associated with any of your addresses; think along the lines of JJ Luna).
Encrypt Your Communication
“This generation being born now... is the last free generation.You are born and either immediately or within say a year you are known globally. Your identity in one form or another –coming as a result of your idiotic parents plastering your name and photos all over Facebook or as a result of insurance applications or passport applications– is known to all major world powers.” – Julian Assange
The vast majority of our community uses Facebook. Unfortunately its network effect is something we all rely on to some degree. Fortunately for us a friend of our community created FaceMask. Through FaceMask we can still use Facebook in complete privacy- away from Zuckerberg's prying eyes. In the near future we will implement FaceMask into our TDV groups as optional privacy for our posts. We will provide our subscribers with the keys necessary to encrypt and decrypt the messages and posts. Again, this is optional. For now please go to the link above and familiarize yourself with Facemask and its technology.
Don’t use Google. If you are using Google start transitioning out of it. If you are using Gmail, start moving towards encrypted services like ProtonMail or TutaNota. They both offer a free option, try them both out and choose your favorite. Use two factor authentication on everything that requires you to log-in that allows for the use of two factor authentication. Most people use Google Authenticator and Authy. I personally prefer the open source options of FreeOTP & andOTP. Use the one that you find best suited for you. Using one is paramount for security nowadays.
If you are one that uses Google Docs with your team, move instead to CryptPad. The more you use CryptPad the more addicting it becomes; your collaborated work is encrypted and private. You no longer will have to worry about knowing that Google is capturing all of your collaborated work. You can also start using CryptPad for free.
If you are using Skype for conference calls, switch to Jitsi. Jitsi is even easier to use than Skype. If you use their MeetJitsi feature you can just access the encrypted conferencing via any browser by agreeing with your other party on the same predetermined passphrase.
Don’t use regular text messaging. Rather, use Signal, Wickr, Keybase, or Telegram.
Use a VPN
A VPN (virtual private network) encrypts all of your traffic via a private network of servers scattered throughout the world. This process anonymizes your IP address. Make sure you don’t use your identity when using a VPN- that would just give away your identity as being connected with the VPN servers you are using.
Many VPN providers register your activity and can hand it over to government if they so demand it. They break their promises to their clients all the time. Let’s minimize risk by staying away from the most draconian of jurisdictions.
To lessen this issue, do not ever use a VPN that is based out of any of the 5 eyes:
-United Kingdom
-United States
-Australia
-Canada
-New Zealand
Furthermore, avoid VPNs based out of the following nine countries, that combined with the first 5 make up the 14 eyes:
-Denmark
-France
-The Netherlands
-Norway
-Germany
-Belgium
-Italy
-Spain
-Sweden
No VPN is a complete safeguard. In spite of this, it is still best to use one. We recommend you ONLY use it (turn it on) when doing crypto-related things and only crypto-related things on your regular computer. For your new encrypted hardware computer have it on at all times. If you use it to access an actual bank account, or another personal account (including crypto accounts that require your personal information; read coinbase, or any other exchange) — then, again, the use of the VPN use becomes trite.
Here are six VPN options outside of the 14 eyes that we recommend you research further and use at your own discretion:
NordVPN (Panama)
CyberGhost (Romania)
HideMe (Malaysia)
Astrill (Seychelles)
TrustZone (Seychelles)
iVPN (Gibralter)
Like all things in the market now, some VPNs take Crypto as payment—others do not. It is best if you bought your VPN with crypto not not your credit card, debit card, or paypal.
TOR (The Onion Router)
The Onion Router is software that you use as a browser. It protects you by bouncing your communications around a distributed network- throughout the world- of relays runned by volunteers. This prevents evesdroppers from learning your IP address, spying on you, and disclosing your physical location. TOR also allows you to access sites that are blocked.
You can use TOR and a VPN simultaneously. If you are new to all of this, it is best that you just learn how to use the features of your new computer coupled with your preferred VPN. The use of TOR is a little more complicated and you will have to configure it according the specifications of your preferred VPN. As you begin this process, as long as you are using your VPN correctly you should be fine.
Fincen and crypto-exchanges
ShapeShift is now stuck having to require its users to deanonymize their transactions in order to meet KYC and AML requirements; it pretty clear that they got ShapeShift under the Bank Secrecy Act. Stay away from Shapeshift (sorry @erikvorhees).
“Very disappointed that @ShapeShift_io is implementing KYC. Just goes to show that any centralized entity will be pushed in that direction, which is why LN, atomic swaps and Decentralized Exchanges are the only way to resist a surveillance economics.” - Andreas Antonopoulos
As the news of ShapeShift broke out, the market was quick to answer with alternatives. Among the private centric alternatives to ShapeShift we find Godex, ChangeHero, XMR.TO, and Bisq.
ChangeHero and Godex are pretty much the same business concept as ShapeShift. The only difference is that they do not require you to become transparent. XMR.TO allows you to make BTC payments by using Monero.
That is, by using Monero together with XMR.TO you can pay any BTC address in the world while protecting your privacy.
Bisq is the Best Option
The most important to focus on is Bisq. Bisq is a complete decentralized exchange. Bisq is instantly accessible- there is no need for registration or approval from a central authority. The system is decentralized peer-to-peer and trading cannot be stopped or censored.
Bisq is safe. Unlike MtGox and the rest of centralized exchanges, Bisq never holds your funds. Bisq provides a system of decentralized arbitration with security deposits that protect traders. The privacy is set where no one except trading partners exchange personal identifying information. All personal data is stored locally.
All communication on Bisq is end-to-end encrypted routed over Tor. Upon downloading and running Bisq TOR runs on Bisq automatically. Every aspect of the development of Bisq is open source.
Bisq is easy to use. If you are accustomed to centralized exchanges, you might find Bisq a little different. If you want anonymity and privacy, this is the best crypto exchange we have. Tell your friends about Bisq. Just download Bisq and take it for a test drive, you will feel fresh freedom of entering into peaceful voluntary exchange with your fellow man. Do it, it’s good for the soul.
On Cody
I would like to personally thank all of our subscribers for generously donating to Defense Distributed on our last issue. At the moment of us putting out our last newsletter, DefDist had raised less than 100k USD. After our Newsletter got out, his donations went past 300k USD.
Thank you very much for helping out our friends in their continual fight for freedom!
Please pray for Cody, his friends, and his family.
I once asked Cody what his background was- because idk his mannerisms have always been interesting to me. He answered; “I am Romani- I am a Gypsy.”
Thank you for helping out our Gypsy friend and his band of rebels! They will very much be using your generous donations now that things got much more serious.
If you haven’t donated, please consider donating. Blessings!
By Rafael LaVerde
Excerpt taken from The Dollar Vigilante September 2018 Issue
https://dollarvigilante.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/TDV-September-2018-Issue.pdf
submitted by 2012ronpaul2012 to conspiracy [link] [comments]

A Guide to Keeping Keys Offline Using Armory +rPi

Hi Redditors.
I am going to post in this thread my experiences in getting my Desktop (Debian) machine running Armory in watch-only mode, and coupling that with an offline Raspberry Pi (which holds my private keys) for signing the transactions previously made in watch-only mode.
I actually compiled Armory from source directly on my Pi. This guide is probably more for the bitcoin 'power user', as to run Armory online, and broadcast the signed transactions, you need to have a bitcoin full node running (bitcoind).
Basic requirements:
Aimed-for Setup:
I'll post the guide in digestible sections...

Section 1

I should begin by saying I installed source code from git, and got Armory to build the DB on my desktop initially, WITHOUT creating a wallet.. (This allowed me to debug what was going on a little!)
Go to Bitcoin.org, select Armory..
It leads to a Download from Git:
https://github.com/goatpig/BitcoinArmory/releases
Followed the procedure for Linux Debian verify code, compile, install, all straight-forward..
Began by running bitcoind, and telling Armory where to find it. This is the command I used, obviously it was all on one line and didn't include the arrows/explanations!:
python ArmoryQt.py \ --satoshi-datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks \ # <-----(where my bitcoind blocks live) --datadir=/ArmoryDataDi \ # <-----(this is instead of ~/.armory) --dbdir=/ArmoryDataDidatabases # <-------(again, non std. place used for Armory's databases.. my choice.) 
So, on the Desktop, after the initial "build databases"
(NB the initial "Build Databases" took about 1.5h and my two CPUs were maxed the whole time, Temps up to 62C. Not ideal; Im not in a rush!)
I then wanted to import a watch-only wallet.
Before I did this, I took a full backup of the Armory data dir:
/ArmoryDataDi
(or ~/.armory in a default installation).
I'd hate to have to make Armory do another full sync with the bitcoind node!

Section 2

Next step: offline wallet (with Private Keys) is on a Raspberry Pi.
I downloaded the source and managed to compile it on the pi itself! :)
Though there were some gymnastics needed to setup the Pi.
My Pi is running Raspbian based on Wheezy.. quite old!
I did the following on the Pi:
apt-get update apt-get upgrade (<---took about an hour!) apt-get install autotools-dev apt-get install autoconf 
Then I followed the instructions exactly as I had done for my Debian Desktop machine, EXCEPT:
I had to increase the Pi's swap space. I upped it from 100Mb to 400Mb.
The compilation took 7 hours, and my poor SD card got a thrashing.
But after compilation, I put the Swap back to 100Mb and Armory runs ok with about 150Mb of memory (no swap needed).
Swap increase on the Pi:
use your favourite editor, and open the file /etc/dphys-swapfile
add/change the following line:
CONF_SWAPSIZE=400 
Then, REBOOT the Pi:
sudo shutdown -h -P now 
Once the compilation was done on the Pi, put the swap back, rebooted and created an Armory wallet.
I added manual entropy and upped the encryption 'time' from 250ms to 2500ms - since the Pi is slow, but I'll be happy to wait for more iterations in the Key Derivation Function.
Once the wallet was created, it obviously prompts you for backup.
I want to add a private key of my own (i.e. import), so don't do the backup until this is over.
I import my Private Key, and Armory checks that this corresponds to a Public Key, which I check is correct.
This is the point now where the Pi storage medium (e.g an SD card) has to be properly destroyed if you ever get rid of it.
I had thought that now would be a good time to decide if your new wallet will generate Segwit receiving addresses, and also addresses used to receive 'change' after a transaction..
But it seems Armory WON'T let you switch to P2SH-P2WPKH unless your Armory is connected to a node offering "WITNESS" service.
Obviously, my Pi is offline and will never connect to a node, so the following will not work on the Pi:
NB: I thought about setting this on the Debian "watch-only" wallet, but that would surely mean doom, as the Pi would not know about those addresses and backups might not keep them.. who knows...
So, end result:- no segwit for me just yet in my offline funds.

--If anyone can offer a solution to this, I'd be very grateful--

Section 3

Ok, now this is a good point to back up your wallet on the Pi. It has your imported keys. I choose a Digital Backup - and put it on a USB key, which will never touch the internet and will be stored off-site. I also chose to encrypt it, because I'm good with passwords..
NB: The Armory paper backup will NOT back up your imported private keys, so keep those somewhere if you're not sweeping them. It would be prudent to have an Armory paper backup anyway, but remember it will likely NOT help you with that imported key.
Now for the watch-only copy of the wallet. I want to get the "watch-only" version onto my Desktop Debian machine.
On the Pi, I created (exported to a USB key) a "watching-only" copy of my wallet.
I would use the RECOMMENDED approach, export the "Entire Wallet File".
As you will see below, I initially exported only the ROOT data, which will NOT capture the watching-only part of the Private Key I entered manually above (i.e. the public Key!).
Now, back on the Debian Desktop machine...
I stopped all my crontab jobs; just give Armory uninterrupted CPU/memory/disk...
I also stopped bitcoind and made a backup prior to any watch-only wallet being imported.
I already made a backup of Armory on my Desktop, before any wallet import.
(this was needed, as I made a mistake.. see below)
So on the Debian Desktop machine, I begin by firing up bitcoind.
my command for this is:
./bitcoind -daemon -datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414 -dbcache=400 -maxmempool=400 

Section 4

I try running Armory like this:
(I'm actually starting Armory from a script - StartArm.sh)
Inside the script StartArm.sh, it has the line:
python ArmoryQt.py --ram-usage=4 --satoshi-datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks --datadir=/ArmoryDataDi --dbdir=/ArmoryDataDidatabases 
I know from bitter experience that doing a scan over the blockchain for a new wallet takes a looong time and a lot of CPU, and I'd like it to play nicely; not gobble all the memory and swap and run my 2xCPUs both at 100% for four hours...
So... I aim to run with --ram-usage=X and --thread-count=X
(For me in the end, X=1 but I began with X=4)
I began with --ram-usage=4 (<--- = 4x128Mb)
The result is below...
TypeError: cannot concatenate 'str' and 'int' objects 
It didn't recognise the ram-usage and carried on, crippling my Debian desktop PC.
This is where it gets dangerous; Armory can gobble so much memory and CPU that the windowing environment can cease up, and it can take over 30 minutes just to exit nicely from bitcoind and ArmoryDB.
So, I ssh to the machine from another computer, and keep an eye on it with the command
"free -h" 
I'd also be able to do a "sudo reboot now" if needed from here.

Section 5

So, trying to get my --ram-usage command recognised, I tried this line (added quotes):
python ArmoryQt.py --ram-usage="4" --satoshi-datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks --datadir=/ArmoryDataDi --dbdir=/ArmoryDataDidatabases 
But no, same error...
Loading Armory Engine: Armory Version: 0.96.4 Armory Build: None PyBtcWallet Version: 1.35 Detected Operating system: Linux OS Variant : ('debian', '9.4', '') User home-directory : /home/ Satoshi BTC directory : /BlockChain/chain20180414 Armory home dir : /ArmoryDataDi ArmoryDB directory : /ArmoryDataDidatabases Armory settings file : /ArmoryDataDiArmorySettings.txt Armory log file : /ArmoryDataDiarmorylog.txt Do wallet checking : True (ERROR) ArmoryUtils.py:3723 - Unsupported language specified. Defaulting to English (en) (ERROR) ArmoryQt.py:1833 - Failed to start Armory database: cannot concatenate 'str' and 'int' objects Traceback (most recent call last): File "ArmoryQt.py", line 1808, in startArmoryDBIfNecessary TheSDM.spawnDB(str(ARMORY_HOME_DIR), TheBDM.armoryDBDir) File "/BitcoinArmory/SDM.py", line 387, in spawnDB pargs.append('--ram-usage=' + ARMORY_RAM_USAGE) TypeError: cannot concatenate 'str' and 'int' objects 

Section 6

So, I edit the Armory python file SDM.py:
if ARMORY_RAM_USAGE != -1: pargs.append('--ram-usage=4') #COMMENTED THIS, SO I CAN HARDCODE =4 # ' + ARMORY_RAM_USAGE) 
Running it, I now have acknowledgement of the --ram-usage=4:
(WARNING) SDM.py:400 - Spawning DB with command: /BitcoinArmory/ArmoryDB --db-type="DB_FULL" --cookie --satoshi-datadir="/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks" --datadir="/ArmoryDataDi" --dbdir="/ArmoryDataDidatabases" --ram-usage=4 
Also, even with ram-usage=4, it used too much memory, so I told it to quit.
It took over 30 minutes to stop semi-nicely. The last thing it reported was:
ERROR - 00:25:21: (StringSockets.cpp:351) FcgiSocket::writeAndRead FcgiError: unexpected fcgi header version 
But that didn't seem to matter or corrupt the Armory Database, so I think it's ok.
So, I get brave and change SDM.py as below, and I make sure my script has a command line for --ram-usage="ABCDE" and --thread-count="FGHIJ"; the logic being that these strings "ABCDE" will pass the IF criteria below, and my hardcoded values will be used...
if ARMORY_RAM_USAGE != -1: pargs.append('--ram-usage=1') #COMMENTED THIS, SO I CAN HARDCODE =1 # ' + ARMORY_RAM_USAGE) if ARMORY_THREAD_COUNT != -1 pargs.append('--thread-count=1') #COMMENTED THIS, SO I CAN HARDCODE =1 #' + ARMORY_THREAD_COUNT) 
So, as usual, I use my script and start this with: ./StartArm.sh
(which uses command line:)
python ArmoryQt.py --ram-usage="ABCDE" --thread-count="FGHIJ" --satoshi-datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks --datadir=/ArmoryDataDi --dbdir=/ArmoryDataDidatabases 
(this forces it to use my hard-coded values in SDM.py...)
So, this is the command which it reports that it starts with:
(WARNING) SDM.py:400 - Spawning DB with command: /BitcoinArmory/ArmoryDB --db-type="DB_FULL" --cookie --satoshi-datadir="/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks" --datadir="/ArmoryDataDi" --dbdir="/ArmoryDataDidatabases" --ram-usage=1 --thread-count=1 
Again, this is where it gets dangerous; Armory can gobble so much memory and CPU that the windowing environment can cease up. So I ssh to the machine and keep an eye on it with:
"free -h" 

Section 7

So, on the Debian Desktop PC, I inserted the USB stick with the watch-only wallet I exported from the Pi.
Start Armory...
Import "Entire Wallet File" watch-only copy.
Wait 4 hours..
YAY!!!
After running Armory for about 30m, the memory usage dropped by 400m... wierd...
It took ~2 hours to get 40% completion.
After 3.5 hours it's almost there...
The memory went up to about 1.7Gb in use and 900Mb of Swap, but the machine remained fairly responsive throughout, apart from a few (10?) periods at the start, where it appeared to freeze for 10-30s at a time.
(That's where my ssh session came in handy - I could check the machine was still ok with a "free -h" command)
Now, I can:
Create an unsigned transaction on my Desktop,
Save the tx to USB stick,
Move to the Pi,
Sign the tx,
Move back to the Desktop,
Broadcast the signed tx.

Section 8

My initial Mistake:
This caused me to have to roll-back my Armory database, using the backup. so you should try to avoid doing this..
On the Pi, I exported only the ROOT data, which will NOT capture the watching-only part of the Private Key
It is RECOMMENDED to use the Digital Export of Entire Wallet File from the Pi when making a watch-only copy. If you just export just the "ROOT data", not the "Entire Wallet File", you'll have problems if you used an imported Private Key in the offline wallet, like I did.
Using the ROOT data text import, after it finished... my balance was zero. So,. I tried a Help->Rescan Balance (Restart Armory, takes 1minute to get back up and running) No Luck. Still zero balance.
So, I try Rescan Databases.. This will take longer. Nah.. no luck.
So, I tried again, thinking it might be to do with the fact that I imported the text "root data" stuff, instead of following the (Recommended) export of watching-wallet file.
So, I used my Armory backup, and wound back the ArmoryDataDi to the point before the install of the (zero balance) wallet. (you should not need to do this, as you will hopefully use the RECOMMENDED approach of exporting the "Entire Wallet File"!)
submitted by fartinator to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Got my Bitcoin/LN Node up and running on testnet. Have a few questions.

Bare with with me as I'm still new to fully understanding how Bitcoin and the LN work. And I'm an even bigger newbie when it comes to Linux, which is why I installed 'Raspberry PI Desktop'. I wanted to closely follow the guide mentioned below (with a few changes as to accommodate the i686 processor).

I had some old hardware laying around and decided to attempt a Bitcoin/LN Node setup using the following guide: https://github.com/Stadicus/guides/blob/masteraspibolt/README.md

My Hardware Specs:
I downloaded the "Debian Stretch with Raspberry PI Desktop" disk image on the 32GB SD Memory Card. I then tried to do an install to the 4GB SSD, but I don't think the 4GB was enough disk space because the system install would stop/error at around 32%. After several failed attempts I decided to just "Run with persistence" from the SD card, which worked. After about a day and a half (breaks in between), I finally got testnet up and running. I'll be staying on testnet for a while until I familiarize myself with everything, with that said, I'm hoping some of you Linux and Bitcoin savvy people can answer a few questions/concerns.

TL;DR: I setup a Bitcoin/LN Node on testnet, and have a few questions below.

Linux Related:
  1. On boot/reboot I get this message below, should I be concerned? I'm not sure what it means, how can I stop this message? I'm able to just hit Ctrl+D, which the system continues booting normally afterwards.
"No Caching mode page found" and "Assuming drive cache: write through"
"After logging in type 'journalctl -xb' to view system logs, 'systemctl reboot' to reboot or ^D to try again to boot into default mode."

Bitcoin/LN Related:
  1. Is the LN wallet the same as my Bitcoin Node wallet? (I don't see the step where I created a wallet on the "Bitcoin" section using the guide I mentioned at the top of this post. But I do see the step of creating the LN wallet in the "Lightning" section by using the following command - "lncli --network=testnet create".)
  2. Do I need to unlock my wallet every time I restart? Is this required to use the LN? (I noticed when I restart my system and do a "sudo journalctl -f -u lnd", It prompts me for my wallet password, or create a new one.)
  3. What are the characters at the end of the command below(np2wkh) when creating a new address? Do I generate a new address every time I want to receive a payment? ("lncli --network=testnet newaddress np2wkh")
  4. Why does my LN wallet balance display differently than what I requested from a faucet? (The testnet faucet says 0.01 max, which I sent to my wallet address. But my LN wallet displays as "total_balance 199637".)
  5. If I need to restart my node, is there a correct way of doing so? How do I make sure i don't affect open channels?
I know I have other questions, but I can't remember them off the top of my head right now. Thanks

submitted by StarsAndBolts to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Dogecoin on Linux - The Complete Beginner's Guide

I'm writing this because I couldn't find a single condensed guide on compiling the wallet and running mining software on linux, specficially Ubuntu/Linux Mint. I combed Bitcoin and Litecoin forums for similar problems I was running into and eventually got everything nailed down, so here it is in one place, for new Shibes.
If you want to make a Dogecoin directory in your downloads folder to keep things organized, you will need to modify these commands to refelct the change. So instead of going to ~/Downloads/ you will need to go to ~/Downloads/Dogecoin and be sure to put the zipped files there when you download them, but the commands will be the same otherwise.
cwayne18 put in the work to make a PPA for the QT client here.
Ubunutu/Mint/Debian users should be able to install the client with the following commands:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:cwayne18/doge sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install dogecoin-qt 
To update using this method, run
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade dogecoin-qt 
Compiling the Wallet Manually
I suggest using the PPA above, but if you want to compile manually, here you go.
1)Download the newest source from here. If you want to check out the Github page, click here
2)Unzip the package with the native client OR, navigate to your downloads and unzip
cd ~/Downloads unzip dogecoin-master.zip 
3)Now it's time to compile. You will need to install the dependencies, just copy and paste the following code. It will be a fairly large download and could take some time. It is always important to update before installing any new software, so we'll do that first and then install the dependencies.
sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade sudo apt-get install libssl-dev libdb-dev libdb++-dev libqrencode-dev qt4-qmake libqtgui4 libqt4-dev sudo apt-get install libminiupnpc-dev libminiupnpc8 libboost-all-dev build-essential git libboost1.53-all-dev 
4)Once that is done, go to the doge-coin master directory and compile:
cd ~/Downloads/dogecoin-maste sed -i 's/-mgw46-mt-sd-1_53//g' dogecoin-qt.pro qmake USE_UPNP=- USE_QRCODE=0 USE_IPV6=0 make -j3 
After running the qmake command you will likely see some text similar to
Project MESSAGE: Building without UPNP support Project MESSAGE: Building with UPNP supportRemoved plural forms as the target language has less forms. If this sounds wrong, possibly the target language is not set or recognized. 
It's perfectly normal, so don't worry about that.
Your Dogewallet is ready to go! The executable is in ~/Downloads/dogecoin-maste and called dogecoin-qt. Your wallet information is in ~/.dogecoin. You can run the wallet at any time by opening terminal and typing
cd ~/Downloads/dogecoin-maste ./dogecoin-qt 
Future upgrades to dogewallet are easy. Back up your wallet.dat, and simply follow the same directions above, but you'll be unzipping and building the newer version. You will likely need to rename the old dogecoin-master directory in ~/Downloads before unzipping the newest version and building. Also, it is likely that you will not need to install the dependencies again.
Alternate Method For Installing Dogecoin Wallet from Nicebreakfast
After installing the dependencies listed in step 3, open terminal, then navigate to where you want Dogecoin Wallet stored and run:
git clone https://github.com/dogecoin/dogecoin ./autogen.sh ./configure make 
then when the wallet is updated just run
git pull 
from the dogecoin directory.
GPU Mining
GPU mining requires CGminer. My suggestion is to get the executable already built. The creator of cgminer has removed the built file from his website, but I've uploaded it here
sudo apt-get install pkg-config opencl-dev libcurl4-openssl-dev autoconf libtool automake m4 ncurses-dev cd ~/Downloads tar -xvf cgminer-3.7.2-x86_64-built.tar.bz2 
Don't use anything newer than 3.7.2. The newer versions of CGMiner don't support GPU mining.
That's it! You have cgminer ready to go! You will run cgminer with the following syntax
cd ~/Downloads/cgminer-3.7.2-x86_64-built/ ./cgminer --scrypt -o stratum+tcp://SERVERNAME:PORT -u WORKER.ID -p PASS 
A good guide for fine tuning cgminer can be found here; follow the litecoin example.
EDIT
I had trouble getting cgminer running with a single line command, but running it via an executable .sh file works. This is covered in the cgminer setup guide I posted above but I'll put it here too. In the same directory that has the cgminer executable, you need to make a file called cgminer.sh and make it executable. It should contain the follwing:
export GPU_USE_SYNC_OBJECTS=1 export GPU_MAX_ALLOC_PERCENT=100 export DISPLAY=:0 find *.bin -delete sleep 5 ./cgminer 
Then you can call cgminer in terminal by doing ./cgminer.sh You will need a cgminer.conf file containing all your options. All of this is covered in the guide that is linked above.
A quick note about AMD drivers: They used to be a huge PITA to install and get working, but the newest Catalyst drivers are great. There's a GUI installer, everything works out of the box, and there is a lot of documentation. You can download them here: AMD Catalyst 14.6 Beta Linux
CPU Mining
For CPU mining I use minerd because it doesn't require any work to get running, simply download it and get to work. Download the built file for your machine 32-bit or 64-bit, and then unzip it and you're ready to go!
cd ~/Downloads tar -xvf pooler-cpuminer-2.3.2-linux-x86.tar.gz 
The executable is called minerd and it will be in ~/Downloads but you can move it to wherever you like. To run it, pull up terminal and do
cd ~/Downloads minerd --url=stratum+tcp://SERVER:PORT --userpass=USERNAME.WORKERNAME:WORKERPASSWORD 
You're done! Happy mining!
Common Issues
I ran into this and I've seen others with this problem as well. Everything installs fine but there is a shared library file that isn't where it should be. In fact, it isn't there at all.
 libudev.so.1: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory 
In terminal, do
sudo updatedb locate libudev.so.0.13.0 
And it will probably return a path /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu. Inside that directory there's a library file called libudev.so.0.13.0. You'll need to make a symlink (aka shortcut) that links libudev.so.1 to libudev.so.0.13.0 So, assuming you're working with libudev.so.0.13.0 do this
cd /lib/x86_64-linux-gnu sudo ln -s libudev.so.0.13.0 libudev.so.1 
Now if you do
ln -l 
You should see
libudev.so.1 -> ./libudev.so.0.13.0 
Meaning you've made the symlink. Also, the text for libudev.so.1 will be blue.
submitted by Boozybrain to dogecoin [link] [comments]

Homelab collective ressources post!

Hey guys!
I'm fairly new to this sub and to having a home lab in general and I found this community to be so kind and helping, I wanted to give back what I've learned. I'm seeing a lot of questions asked around on improvements and on what to do with x extra hardware so I thought it would be nice to have a thread to regroup that.
 
I'll put here some stuff I gathered and the most common questions I've seen, feel free to contribute and i'll update the post along.
 
Latest Additions
 
Homelab Dashboard
Posts about dashboards have been growing lately and here are some of the best that were kind enough to provide us with their sources.
User Screenshot Source
yours truly http://imgur.com/a/GhCNH https://github.com/Gabisonfire/dashboard-q
lastditchefrt http://i.imgur.com/5zQdao4.png https://github.com/d4rk22/Network-Status-Page
_SleepingBag_ http://i.imgur.com/Ql9ZM4W.png https://github.com/jsank/homelabdash
NiknakSi https://niknak.org/extras/sysinfo TBA
DainBramaged http://imgur.com/jYNlUEQ https://github.com/gordonturneBigBoard
michaelh4u https://i.imgur.com/XkZwMKj.png https://github.com/michaelh4u/homelabfrontpage
spigotx http://imgur.com/a/1zMht https://github.com/spigotx/HomeLab2
SirMaster https://nicko88.com/ https://github.com/dashbad/plex-server-status
yourofl10 http://imgur.com/a/AyROa TBA
TheBobWiley http://imgur.com/a/oU6d3 https://github.com/TheBobWiley/ManageThis-LandingPages
0110010001100010 http://i.imgur.com/iwtQcsL.jpg https://github.com/danodemano/monitoring-scripts
mescon & SyNiK4L https://i.imgur.com/gqdVM6p.jpg https://github.com/mescon/Muximux
ak_rex http://i.imgur.com/a/RJkrT https://github.com/ak-rex/homelab-dashboard
 
Or build yours from scratch: PRTG API, ELK, Grafana, freeboard, JumpSquares
 
Some other resources: Custom Monitoring Scripts by 0110010001100010
 
Credits to apt64 for his original post
= Pi specific =
 
= Download Automation =
 
= Virtualization =
 
= Monitoring =
 
= Media Center =
 
= Remote access =
 
= VOIP =
 
= Networking =
 
= File Servers/Storage/RAID =
 
= Cameras =
 
= Documentation =
 
= Dynamic DNS =
 
= Backup =
 
= Creating network diagrams =
 
= Guides =
 
= Misc =
 
That's all I could come up with on top of my head + some research, passing over to you guys so we can get a nice complete list!
 
Let's try and stick with free(or mostly) softwares, let me know if you guys feel otherwise.
submitted by Gabisonfire to homelab [link] [comments]

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ProtonVPN in the blink of an eye:

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Therefore, please take the time and read the ProtonVPN Threat Model to see from what ProtonVPN can protect you. Please also take the time and read the Terms & Conditions and the Privacy Policy.
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We have an unofficial, community-made, open-source Linux GUI. Please use at your own risk.
You can find all servers and their load listed here: https://protonvpn.com/vpn-servers
If you experience DNS leaks on linux, check the following guide: https://www.reddit.com/ProtonVPN/comments/7t5gsa/i_always_got_dns_leaks_on_linux_with_openvpn_cli/dtek7gi/
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If you have any suggestions regarding this thread, please don't hesitate to write a comment or contact us via mod mail!
submitted by R3v0xz to ProtonVPN [link] [comments]

Encryption is No Longer an Option - Ways to Restore Your Natural Right to Privacy

Encryption is No Longer an Option
“If the State’s going to move against you, it’s going to move against you. Now, that doesn’t mean you need to be reckless of course. I’m awful careful you guys, and even my degree of care and control ultimately won’t be enough if they get mad enough. There will always be something…I’ve done what I hope is the best any man can do. So…I hope when they finally do get me, it’s obvious that they just made it up. I don’t go out of my way to make it easy.” – Cody Wilson
For all Anarchists our love for freedom unites us and guides us. I recently had a conversation with a mutual friend that Cody and I have in common and he stated something very insightful:
CryptoAnarchy is like the Lord of the Rings. You have to cooperate with people that you don’t know where they are or what they’re up to. That is, you just know that we are all figuring out at the same time on how to take down Sauron.
Anarchy is guided by the natural instinct for self-preservation. You can trust that others are also actively working in keeping us all free.
For us all to move into more synergistic cooperation we need more motivation. Nothing is more motivating than our movement away from an impending harmful evil. The persecution that Cody Wilson has gone through since he started his activism is testament to the evil that awaits the entire world if we do not fight against the impending digital global prison. Just note how easy it was to find Cody. Government indoctrinated brownshirts and surveillance are everywhere.
As Jeff recently said in London, “CryptoAnarchy is about the cryptography.” Cryptocurrency is only possible due to the privacy offered by cryptography. A true cryptocurrency is completely fungible, anonymous, and private. Blockchains without on-chain privacy set by default, are dangerous and offer nothing other than accurate surveillance.
That is, the moment you destroy a coin’s fungibility you corrupt its incentive structure. This is because you would then have two classes of the same coin within a transparent blockchain; these are coins that are “tainted” or “untainted” according to government. This differentiation created by blockchain surveillance leads “tainted” coins to be priced differently from “untainted” coins. Once this happens you destroy the functionality of a currency as a medium of exchange.
Imagine the headache of retailers in having to tell clients that they only accept “untainted” bitcoins. The result of not having a fungible medium of exchange is that you destroy the incentive structure of the network effect of a coin. You simply end up with a useless and unwanted network where value is supposed to be exchanged. If the units within the medium of exchange do not themselves contain the same value in the market, the utility of the network effect is destroyed.
The economic ramifications of non-fungible SurveillanceCoins are so bad that they make fiat currencies of central banks look good. In spite of their centralized proof of government violence, fiat currencies are more fungible and private than a coin based on a transparent blockchain.
For much time within crypto we would call the majority of blockchains as “pseudo-anonymous” because we knew the importance of fungibility. At that time blockchain analysis had not caught up to our technology. Now companies like Elliptic and Chainalysis have made the vast majority of blockchains in the market transparent.
Sadly, most blockchain communities have not upgraded their privacy to be on chain by default- making them transparent. However, some more intelligent communities- like Monero- are at the same time growing because they understand the importance of fungibility.
Please understand that we at TDV are ahead of the pack in understanding where all of this is going. The vast majority of people won’t tell you these harsh truths about the Blockchain space, but it is our moral imperative to inform you as best as possible.
As time goes on, we will continue to champion actual fungible CryptoCurrencies and we will continue to make clear distinctions between a SurveillanceCoin and an actual CryptoCurrency.
It is important that we take a step back from CryptoCurrencies and focus on just cryptography. You can never be too careful. Throughout our groups we have had various requests as to how to better use different wallets.
Yes, we will cover all of that in our upcoming surprise for our community, but what is most important is that you protect yourself at the network layer, your identity, and your communication.
CryptoAnarchy began way before Bitcoin. If you want to know what will be happening to CryptoCurrencies and CryptoAnarchy in the near future, you need to read Timothy C. May’s 1992 prophetic Crypto Anarchist Manifesto.
On reading this, you cannot afford to be idle regarding your privacy. This is not the time for you to easily give up what is most personal about you; your thoughts and identity. Your privacy is sacred. You need to protect your privacy as much as possible at all times. Don’t give into the defeatist notions of future technology being capable of deanonymizing any cryptography you currently use. Your goal is to be private right now in the present moment.
You are up against a global digital tyranny- that is already here!
...Cazes was not a US citizen and the Alphabay servers and Cazes were not caught on US soil. Just because crimes involving narcotic deals took place in America, weirdly enough, the US seemingly has the right above anyone to seize Cazes’ property, and charge him and his accomplices in US trials...
Use Secure Hardware That Protects You
Be paranoid. Stay paranoid. The more paranoid you are the better. Currently the five eyes are moving to strip away all of your privacy. They are on the direct path to force all companies to hand over back doors to software and hardware encryption.
This is a new breach on individual rights. The backdoors in hardware have existed since the 90’s via Trusted Computing and Digital Rights Management (DRM). The difference is that now companies will be fined and forced by governments (all governments) to open up backdoors for the surveillance of all- in both software and hardware. Australia is leading the charge since they are the only ones within the five eyes without a Bill of Rights.
If you really want to be secure, then you need to start with your hardware. Almost all laptops and hardware chips are engineered with unsafe software. These chips can transmit voice, your networking, pictures, and even video signals. Many of these chips are used to install spyware, malware and viruses.
The market has provided us with two easy plug-and-play hardware solutions.
Purism is a CryptoAnarchist company dedicated in offering us the safest computers in the market. Purism’s line of Librem Laptops is manufactured with software and hardware built from the ground up, where you can be at ease knowing there are no back doors built within it. They work with hardware component suppliers and the Free software community in making hardware that respects and protects your security. Every chip is individually selected with emphasis on respecting freedom. (Purism Librem laptops have built in Kill-Switches for your microphone/camera and wireless/Bluetooth)
All of the necessary components that you would have to bundle up together- by yourself- from a community vetted place like Prism-Break are already installed and ready to go within Librem laptops. Even if you were to install all of the necessary open-source encrypted alternatives, you still would not be able to 100% trust your current computer’s hardware.
Purism Librem laptops come with their own PureOS (operating system). Purism also offers compatibility with Qubes OS in a flash-drive (similar to Tails) to give you even another layer of protection on top of PureOS. Qubes OS is what Edward Snowden uses. PureOs is a derivative of Debian GNU/Linux. Qubes is free and open-source software (FOSS).
Purism is currently having a pre-sale for their first phone the Librem 5.
Another popular safe hardware computer market alternative is ORWL. ORWL is a desktop PC. ORWL comes with a physical encryption key that looks like a keychain. If anyone ever tries to physically tamper with the ORWL computer, sensors will automatically detect the intrusion and erase everything. ORWL comes with the operating system options of Qubes OS, Ubuntu, or Windows.
ORWL does not receive payment for their products in Crypto. Purism on the other hand accepts payment in BitcoinCore, BitcoinCash, Litecoin, Ethereum, Decred, Dogecoin, and Monero.
ORWL is a good alternative for more computer savvy people. If you are not the most competent person with computers, Purism is the way to go. With Purism everything is ready to go.
Once you get good hardware don’t use this new computer for anything other than crypto stuff. That is, don’t use it with anything that requires your slave identity. Don’t access social media with your name, don’t access bank accounts, don’t access crypto exchanges, don’t access old email accounts, definitely don’t access anything that requires KYC and AML, and don’t access any identifying log-in that is related to any of your previous internet identities. Create new identities from scratch for this new computer.
Watch this video and learn about the basics on operational security (OPSEC). Take everything written here, and spoken at the conference in the video above, as barely the preliminary basic requirements of OPSEC. You should definitely continue your own research upon getting your new secure hardware computer.
(It would be best if you purchased this computer using crypto- Monero preferably- and have it mailed to a mailing address not associated with any of your addresses; think along the lines of JJ Luna).
Encrypt Your Communication
“This generation being born now... is the last free generation.You are born and either immediately or within say a year you are known globally. Your identity in one form or another –coming as a result of your idiotic parents plastering your name and photos all over Facebook or as a result of insurance applications or passport applications– is known to all major world powers.” – Julian Assange
The vast majority of our community uses Facebook. Unfortunately its network effect is something we all rely on to some degree. Fortunately for us a friend of our community created FaceMask. Through FaceMask we can still use Facebook in complete privacy- away from Zuckerberg's prying eyes. In the near future we will implement FaceMask into our TDV groups as optional privacy for our posts. We will provide our subscribers with the keys necessary to encrypt and decrypt the messages and posts. Again, this is optional. For now please go to the link above and familiarize yourself with Facemask and its technology.
Don’t use Google. If you are using Google start transitioning out of it. If you are using Gmail, start moving towards encrypted services like ProtonMail or TutaNota. They both offer a free option, try them both out and choose your favorite. Use two factor authentication on everything that requires you to log-in that allows for the use of two factor authentication. Most people use Google Authenticator and Authy. I personally prefer the open source options of FreeOTP & andOTP. Use the one that you find best suited for you. Using one is paramount for security nowadays.
If you are one that uses Google Docs with your team, move instead to CryptPad. The more you use CryptPad the more addicting it becomes; your collaborated work is encrypted and private. You no longer will have to worry about knowing that Google is capturing all of your collaborated work. You can also start using CryptPad for free.
If you are using Skype for conference calls, switch to Jitsi. Jitsi is even easier to use than Skype. If you use their MeetJitsi feature you can just access the encrypted conferencing via any browser by agreeing with your other party on the same predetermined passphrase.
Don’t use regular text messaging. Rather, use Signal, Wickr, Keybase, or Telegram.
Use a VPN
A VPN (virtual private network) encrypts all of your traffic via a private network of servers scattered throughout the world. This process anonymizes your IP address. Make sure you don’t use your identity when using a VPN- that would just give away your identity as being connected with the VPN servers you are using.
Many VPN providers register your activity and can hand it over to government if they so demand it. They break their promises to their clients all the time. Let’s minimize risk by staying away from the most draconian of jurisdictions.
To lessen this issue, do not ever use a VPN that is based out of any of the 5 eyes:
-United Kingdom
-United States
-Australia
-Canada
-New Zealand
Furthermore, avoid VPNs based out of the following nine countries, that combined with the first 5 make up the 14 eyes:
-Denmark
-France
-The Netherlands
-Norway
-Germany
-Belgium
-Italy
-Spain
-Sweden
No VPN is a complete safeguard. In spite of this, it is still best to use one. We recommend you ONLY use it (turn it on) when doing crypto-related things and only crypto-related things on your regular computer. For your new encrypted hardware computer have it on at all times. If you use it to access an actual bank account, or another personal account (including crypto accounts that require your personal information; read coinbase, or any other exchange) — then, again, the use of the VPN use becomes trite.
Here are six VPN options outside of the 14 eyes that we recommend you research further and use at your own discretion:
NordVPN (Panama)
CyberGhost (Romania)
HideMe (Malaysia)
Astrill (Seychelles)
TrustZone (Seychelles)
iVPN (Gibralter)
Like all things in the market now, some VPNs take Crypto as payment—others do not. It is best if you bought your VPN with crypto not not your credit card, debit card, or paypal.
TOR (The Onion Router)
The Onion Router is software that you use as a browser. It protects you by bouncing your communications around a distributed network- throughout the world- of relays runned by volunteers. This prevents evesdroppers from learning your IP address, spying on you, and disclosing your physical location. TOR also allows you to access sites that are blocked.
You can use TOR and a VPN simultaneously. If you are new to all of this, it is best that you just learn how to use the features of your new computer coupled with your preferred VPN. The use of TOR is a little more complicated and you will have to configure it according the specifications of your preferred VPN. As you begin this process, as long as you are using your VPN correctly you should be fine.
Fincen and crypto-exchanges
ShapeShift is now stuck having to require its users to deanonymize their transactions in order to meet KYC and AML requirements; it pretty clear that they got ShapeShift under the Bank Secrecy Act. Stay away from Shapeshift (sorry @erikvorhees).
“Very disappointed that @ShapeShift_io is implementing KYC. Just goes to show that any centralized entity will be pushed in that direction, which is why LN, atomic swaps and Decentralized Exchanges are the only way to resist a surveillance economics.” - Andreas Antonopoulos
As the news of ShapeShift broke out, the market was quick to answer with alternatives. Among the private centric alternatives to ShapeShift we find Godex, ChangeHero, XMR.TO, and Bisq.
ChangeHero and Godex are pretty much the same business concept as ShapeShift. The only difference is that they do not require you to become transparent. XMR.TO allows you to make BTC payments by using Monero.
That is, by using Monero together with XMR.TO you can pay any BTC address in the world while protecting your privacy.
Bisq is the Best Option
The most important to focus on is Bisq. Bisq is a complete decentralized exchange. Bisq is instantly accessible- there is no need for registration or approval from a central authority. The system is decentralized peer-to-peer and trading cannot be stopped or censored.
Bisq is safe. Unlike MtGox and the rest of centralized exchanges, Bisq never holds your funds. Bisq provides a system of decentralized arbitration with security deposits that protect traders. The privacy is set where no one except trading partners exchange personal identifying information. All personal data is stored locally.
All communication on Bisq is end-to-end encrypted routed over Tor. Upon downloading and running Bisq TOR runs on Bisq automatically. Every aspect of the development of Bisq is open source.
Bisq is easy to use. If you are accustomed to centralized exchanges, you might find Bisq a little different. If you want anonymity and privacy, this is the best crypto exchange we have. Tell your friends about Bisq. Just download Bisq and take it for a test drive, you will feel fresh freedom of entering into peaceful voluntary exchange with your fellow man. Do it, it’s good for the soul.
On Cody
I would like to personally thank all of our subscribers for generously donating to Defense Distributed on our last issue. At the moment of us putting out our last newsletter, DefDist had raised less than 100k USD. After our Newsletter got out, his donations went past 300k USD.
Thank you very much for helping out our friends in their continual fight for freedom!
Please pray for Cody, his friends, and his family.
I once asked Cody what his background was- because idk his mannerisms have always been interesting to me. He answered; “I am Romani- I am a Gypsy.”
Thank you for helping out our Gypsy friend and his band of rebels! They will very much be using your generous donations now that things got much more serious.
If you haven’t donated, please consider donating. Blessings!
By Rafael LaVerde
Excerpt taken from The Dollar Vigilante September 2018 Issue
https://dollarvigilante.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/TDV-September-2018-Issue.pdf
submitted by 2012ronpaul2012 to conspiracyundone [link] [comments]

How to set up a Bitcoin full node on Linux VPS (pruning node)

This tutorial is for Linux Debian based OS (Ubuntu) at least with 1GB of RAM and 20 GB SSD. There are a few guides out there about how to set it up..but still not good enough. My Bitcoin Segwit node now is running on my VPS (yes I know it's not the best option but still..) I found few articles.. Due to these articles I’ve kept the below quite brief.
Please note: Before you start.. Your server may still be finishing installing and booting up during the first few minutes of activation. In this tutorial i'm using Linux Ubuntu 16.04 x64 LTS.
Secure VPS server (Firewall rules)
Command may disrupt existing SSH connection. Proceed with operation (y|n) ? Type y and hit ENTER.
Install the Bitcoin Core daemon (bitcoind)
Press ENTER to continue
Do you want to continue? Type y and hit enter.
Create a Bitcoin user
Enter new UNIX password (whatever you want) and then it will ask for your full name, room number, work phone, home phone, other (press the Enter key to skip). Is the information correct? Type y and hit ENTER.
Set up log rotation
Enter into it:
Press CTRL+X (if you are using nano editor) and then it will say something like this - Save modified buffer (ANSWERING "No" WILL DESTROY CHANGES) ? Type y and hit ENTER.
Configure Bitcoin
Add to the file:
prune=550
Press CTRL+X (if you are using nano editor) and then it will say something like this - Save modified buffer (ANSWERING "No" WILL DESTROY CHANGES) ? Type y and hit ENTER.
Press CTRL+D to log out of the Bitcoin
Configure swap space
The node we created only has 1GB so we’ll make some spare “virtual memory” using swap space.
Add this line at the end of the file:
Press CTRL+X (if you are using nano editor) and then it will say something like this - Save modified buffer (ANSWERING "No" WILL DESTROY CHANGES) ? Type y and hit ENTER.
Set up the Bitcoin daemon to auto-run.
Enter into it (copy paste this):
Press CTRL+X (if you are using nano editor) and then it will say something like this - Save modified buffer (ANSWERING "No" WILL DESTROY CHANGES) ? Type y and hit ENTER.
Reload systemd and start bitcoind:
You can use https://bitnodes.21.co/nodes/ to check if your node is running! If there is something wrong, please let me know that. I'm still learning ;)
submitted by PEARSON1FIED to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[Quick guide] Run a full node with btcd (an alternative to bitcoin-core) on debian

It's good to run a full node, and even better to run one with an alternative implementation to bitcoin-core.
I was surprised how easy it is to install btcd (conformal's alternative implementation of a full node). I was also surprised how little bandwidth a full node uses. This quick guide will get you up and running.
To use this method you will need debian testing (Jessie) because the version of golang on debian stable is too old. However, the binary produced will run on debian stable. You will need about 25GB free to store the blockchain, with an extra 20GB or so if you use the bootstrap.dat torrent.
Probably the same instructions will work on ubuntu (but using sudo instead of root).
INSTRUCTIONS TO RUN A FULL NODE WITH BTCD
On debian testing the steps are:
1 - as root, do
# aptitude update; aptitude install golang mercurial git 
2 - pull in and compile btcd and associated utilities as normal user,
$ mkdir btcd; cd btcd; export GOPATH=$(pwd); $ go get github.com/conformal/btcd/... 
3 - run your node
$ cd bin $ ./btcd --externalip=YOUREXTERNALIP 
(where YOUREXTERNALIP is your external IP address).
4 - on your router, forward port 8333 to the computer your node is running on. Once your node is running, check the port is open with a tool such as canyouseeme.org
5 - enjoy being part of the network!
OPTIONAL STEP A (to download the blockchain faster, to be run before step 3):
A1 - download Jeff Garzik's torrent to bootstrap the blockchain or the magnet link, magnet:?xt=urn:btih:36719ba2cecf9f3bd7c5abfb7a88e939611b536c&dn=bootstrap.dat&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.openbittorrent.com%3A80&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.publicbt.com%3A80&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Fcoppersurfer.tk%3A6969%2Fannounce&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Fopen.demonii.com%3A1337&tr=http%3A%2F%2Fbttracker.crunchbanglinux.org%3A6969%2Fannounce (discussion here)
A2 - run as normal user,
$ ./addblock -i /whatevepath/to/youtorrent/download/bootstrap.dat 
then continue to step 3.
OPTIONAL STEP B (to throttle bandwidth):
B1 - as root, do
# aptitude install trickle 
B2 - as your normal user, instead of step 3, run (where XXX is your desired upload speed limit in KB/s)
$ trickle -u XXX ./btcd 
Edits: see comments. Added note about external IP.
submitted by _supert_ to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Help please, Staking reddcoin on Raspberry Pi (Raspbian Stretch with desktop)

Hello,
I could really use some help setting up a reddcoin wallet on the Raspberry pi. I've tried executing the following 2 guides, but unfortunatly they keep giving me errors. Guide1: https://www.reddit.com/reddCoin/comments/2b8wqm/tutorial_compiling_and_running_the_reddcoin/ Guide2: http://d-lindemann.de/2017/09/reddcoin-staking-mit-raspberry-pi/
instead of using the recommended "Raspbian (Debian Wheezy). The image file name is 2014-06-20-wheezy-raspbian.img." i'm using the latest " Raspbian Stretch with desktop Image with desktop based on Debian Stretch Version: November 2017 Release date: 2017-11-29 Kernel version: 4.9"
Also instead of using Reddcoin v1.3.1.2 i decided to go with the* Reddcoin V2.0.0.0 (latest version todate)*
every step untill step 6 seems to work fine, but then after executing command: make -f makefile.unix" the following error message appears:
make: makefile.unix: No such file or directory make: *** No rule to make target 'makefile.unix'. Stop.
researching that issue led me to abandon the guide1 and move to a more recent version of a guide. https://github.com/joroob/reddcoin/blob/mastedoc/rasp-tut.md following those steps lead to a bignum error at 6.3 after excecuting commands
cd src (to take me to reddcoin/src) make (to start compiling i assume)
the bignum error i'm experiencing now seems to be described very well here: https://github.com/reddcoin-project/reddcoin/issues/103 In there i excecuted the following commands to see if my dependencies were correct.
sudo apt-get build-essential   sudo apt-get install build-essential   sudo apt-get install libtool autotools-dev autoconf   sudo apt-get install libssl-dev   sudo apt-get install libboost-all-dev   sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install db4.8 sudo apt-get install libdb4.8-dev sudo apt-get install libdb4.8++-dev sudo apt-get install libminiupnpc-dev sudo apt-get install libqt4-dev libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler sudo apt-get install libqrencode-dev cd reddcoin .>/autogen.sh ./configure make
However this did not seem to clear my issue. reading on they talk about it being an issue with libssl in debian 9. with the following link. (at this point i'm noticing how the further i go, the less ground is beneath me to stand on.. and i'm not a good swimmer in unix).
anyways final post there says the following code should fix it: https://github.com/peercoin/peercoin/commit/5b09830e5de0f5105534e69dbf4acffb3255869b But what do i do with this link i have no idea. and that's kinda where my progress halts as i cannot for the life of me find out what to do next to troubleshoot this issue.
So TL:DR I'm trying to use the make command in ~/reddcoin/src however it's giving me BIGNUM errors preventing me from making progress.
I'm using PI model B+, Raspbian stretch latest version plz halp...
submitted by FloydStash to reddCoin [link] [comments]

GUIDE: How to use Electrum with your Ledger Nano S on Tails 3.7

TL;DR

The official guide doesn’t provide useful info. Moreover, Tails has some restrictions for security and privacy reasons. This guide uses only well-documented features of Tails and doesn’t require any additional stuff (usb-sticks, other OS etc).

Preconditions

This guide assumes both features are activated on Tails Greeter every startup:

Problem

Tails is based on Debian GNU/Linux. And to detect the Ledger Nano S we need the python library provided by python3-btchip package. This package is available on sid, but it depends on python3 (>= 3.6~). Tails has python 3.5.3 installed. So…

Solution

… we’ll install btchip-python library by means of the python’s pip tool. To make this library persistently installed you should activate Tails “Dotfiles” Persistence feature and restart Tails.
I don’t know how to configure the pip tool to go through Tor. So this guide suggests to use GitHub repositories.
Open terminal in the Home folder and download git repositories:
git clone https://github.com/LedgerHQ/btchip-python.git git clone --recursive https://github.com/trezocython-hidapi.git 
Open root terminal and enter the following commands:
apt update apt install --install-recommends python3-pip apt install cython3 apt install libusb-1.0-0-dev apt install libudev-dev/stretch-backports pip3 install --user /home/amnesia/cython-hidapi/ pip3 install --user /home/amnesia/btchip-python/ cp -a ~/.local/ /live/persistence/TailsData_unlocked/dotfiles/ chown -R amnesia /live/persistence/TailsData_unlocked/dotfiles/.local/ chgrp -R amnesia /live/persistence/TailsData_unlocked/dotfiles/.local/ 
Restart Tails.

Results

To check installation open the folder in terminal:
ls ~/.local/lib/python3.5/site-packages/ 

Usage

Don’t forget every login update udev rules.
Start electrum… and get an error:
Firmware version (or “Bitcoin” app) too old for Segwit support.
Actually the Electrum 3.0.6 is too old for the latest Ledger Nano S firmware. So download Electrum-3.1.3.tar.gz from the official site and untar it. In the electrum directory, run: 'python3 electrum'.
Your feedback is welcome.
HODL!
EDIT_1: fixed typo.
EDIT_2: libudev-dev=237-3~bpo9+1 libudev-dev/stretch-backports
EDIT_3: works for Electrum-3.2.2 on Tails 3.8 as well.
submitted by hebasto to Electrum [link] [comments]

go-ipfs 0.4.11 release candidate

Hey everyone! The release candidate for the next version of ipfs is out, give it a try and let us know if you run into any issues!

0.4.11-rc1 2017-09-14

Ipfs 0.4.11 is a larger release that brings many long-awaited features and performance improvements. These include new datastore options, more efficient bitswap transfers, circuit relay support, ipld plugins and more! Take a look at the full changelog below for a detailed list of every change.
The ipfs datastore has, until now, been a combination of leveldb and a custom git-like storage backend called 'flatfs'. This works well enough for the average user, but different ipfs usecases demand different backend configurations. To address this, we have changed the configuration file format for datastores to be a modular way of specifying exactly how you want the datastore to be structured. You will now be able to configure ipfs to use flatfs, leveldb, badger, an in-memory datastore, and more to suit your needs. See the new datastore documentation for more information.
Bitswap received some much needed attention during this release cycle. The concept of 'Bitswap Sessions' allows bitswap to associate requests for different blocks to the same underlying session, and from that infer better ways of requesting that data. In more concrete terms, parts of the ipfs codebase that take advantage of sessions (currently, only ipfs pin add) will cause much less extra traffic than before. This is done by making optimistic guesses about which nodes might be providing given blocks and not sending wantlist updates to every connected bitswap partner, as well as searching the DHT for providers less frequently. In future releases we will migrate over more ipfs commands to take advantage of bitswap sessions. As nodes update to this and future versions, expect to see idle bandwidth usage on the ipfs network go down noticably.
It is often said that NAT traversal is the hardest problem in peer to peer technology, we tend to agree with this. In an effort to provide a more ubiquitous p2p mesh, we have implemented a relay mechanism that allows willing peers to relay traffic for other peers who might not otherwise be able to communicate with each other. This feature is still pretty early, and currently users have to manually connect through a relay. The next step in this endeavour is automatic relaying, and research for this is currently in progress. We expect that when it lands, it will improve the perceived performance of ipfs by spending less time attempting connections to hard to reach nodes. A short guide on using the circuit relay feature can be found here.
The last feature we want to highlight (but by no means the last feature in this release) is our new plugin system. There are many different workflows and usecases that ipfs should be able to support, but not everyone wants to be able to use every feature. We could simply merge in all these features, but that causes problems for several reasons: first off, the size of the ipfs binary starts to get very large very quickly. Second, each of these different pieces needs to be maintained and updated independently, which would cause significant churn in the codebase. To address this, we have come up with a system that allows users to install plugins to the vanilla ipfs daemon that augment its capabilities. The first of these plugins are a git plugin that allows ipfs to natively address git objects and an ethereum plugin that lets ipfs ingest and operate on all ethereum blockchain data. Soon to come are plugins for the bitcoin and zcash data formats. In the future, we will be adding plugins for other things like datastore backends and specialized libp2p network transports.
In order to simplify its integration with fs-repo-migrations, we've switched the ipfs/go-ipfs docker image from a musl base to a glibc base. For most users this will not be noticable, but if you've been building your own images based off this image, you'll have to update your dockerfile. We recommend a multi-stage dockerfile, where the build stage is based off of a regular Debian or other glibc-based image, and the assembly stage is based off of the ipfs/go-ipfs image, and you copy build artifacts from the build stage to the assembly stage. Note, if you are using the docker image and see a deprecation message, please update your usage. We will stop supporting the old method of starting the dockerfile in the next release.
Finally, I would like to thank all of our contributors, users, supporters, and friends for helping us along the way. Ipfs would not be where it is without you.
submitted by Whyrusleeping to ipfs [link] [comments]

Installing the Electrum Bitcoin in Debian 9 (Stretch) Debian Installation Guide - YouTube install bitcoin full node on debian How to setup a Bitcoin Node in Linux - A guide for ... Tutorial - How to install linux trisquel and bitcoin

Bitcoin Core initial synchronization will take time and download a lot of data. You should make sure that you have enough bandwidth and storage for the full block chain size (over 350GB). If you have a good Internet connection, you can help strengthen the network by keeping your PC running with Bitcoin Core and port 8333 open. Read the full node guide for details. Bitcoin Core is a community ... This guide shows how to install and run Bitcoin Core on a clean Ubuntu 18.04 system. Prerequisites. Although Ubuntu carries Bitcoin Core in the Software Center, the release tends to be out-of-date. For this reason, this tutorial won’t use the Software Center. Compilation from source offers one alternative, but involves many steps. A more direct route is to install a precompiled binary from ... Install Go. The lnd install guide refers to golang-1.10-go, but Ubuntu 16.04 LTS currently has golang-1.9-go. To install the latest go using snap instead: sudo snap install --classic go On success you will see the result: go 1.10 from 'mwhudson' installed or. go 1.11.2 from Michael Hudson-Doyle (mwhudson) installed Create a 'go' directory in your home directory: mkdir go Set go paths, this can ... To install the Bitcoin Core daemon (bitcoind), which is useful for programmers and Instructions for Bitcoin Core and Higher on Windows 8 and May 6, 2018 - How to compile a Bitcoin Full Node on a fresh installation of We're going to run the GUI version first, called bitcoin-qt, then we'll exit it and Jun 1, 2014 - Install Bitcoin-QT Client Wallet for Debian Jessie 8 The Tutorial Shows You How ... install a bitcoin cpuminer on ubuntu/debian. GitHub Gist: instantly share code, notes, and snippets.

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Installing the Electrum Bitcoin in Debian 9 (Stretch)

Debian 10 Buster Linux Install Tutorial (10.3 KDE Plasma) is a 2020 Tutorial on How to Install Debian 10 Buster Linux on a computer, server, and/or virtual m... Installing Debian 10 is not as straightforward as installing other Linux distributions. This Debian 10 installation Guide will overview the Debian 10 install... Tutorial - How to install linux trisquel and bitcoin Trisquel - https://trisquel.info/en/download Universal USB Installer - http://www.pendrivelinux.com/univ... Java Project Tutorial - Make Login and Register Form Step by Step Using NetBeans And MySQL Database - Duration: 3:43:32. 1BestCsharp blog 7,662,402 views The Crypto Dad shows you how to set up the Electrum Bitcoin wallet in the Debian 9 (Stretch) Linux distribution. We go through downloading (with verification) and installing the Electrum bitcoin ...

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