free bitcoin Toolkit + AutoRoll - Ingeniero y Desarrollador

11-26 04:43 - '[Zokos] just open-sourced our Woocommerce script. Easily import your listings from your Woocommerce store to your OpenBazaar node and start selling for free today!' (twitter.com) by /u/bills2 removed from /r/Bitcoin within 52-62min

[Zokos] just open-sourced our Woocommerce script. Easily import your listings from your Woocommerce store to your OpenBazaar node and start selling for free today!
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: bills2
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Ultimate glossary of crypto currency terms, acronyms and abbreviations

I thought it would be really cool to have an ultimate guide for those new to crypto currencies and the terms used. I made this mostly for beginner’s and veterans alike. I’m not sure how much use you will get out of this. Stuff gets lost on Reddit quite easily so I hope this finds its way to you. Included in this list, I have included most of the terms used in crypto-communities. I have compiled this list from a multitude of sources. The list is in alphabetical order and may include some words/terms not exclusive to the crypto world but may be helpful regardless.
2FA
Two factor authentication. I highly advise that you use it.
51% Attack:
A situation where a single malicious individual or group gains control of more than half of a cryptocurrency network’s computing power. Theoretically, it could allow perpetrators to manipulate the system and spend the same coin multiple times, stop other users from completing blocks and make conflicting transactions to a chain that could harm the network.
Address (or Addy):
A unique string of numbers and letters (both upper and lower case) used to send, receive or store cryptocurrency on the network. It is also the public key in a pair of keys needed to sign a digital transaction. Addresses can be shared publicly as a text or in the form of a scannable QR code. They differ between cryptocurrencies. You can’t send Bitcoin to an Ethereum address, for example.
Altcoin (alternative coin): Any digital currency other than Bitcoin. These other currencies are alternatives to Bitcoin regarding features and functionalities (e.g. faster confirmation time, lower price, improved mining algorithm, higher total coin supply). There are hundreds of altcoins, including Ether, Ripple, Litecoin and many many others.
AIRDROP:
An event where the investors/participants are able to receive free tokens or coins into their digital wallet.
AML: Defines Anti-Money Laundering laws**.**
ARBITRAGE:
Getting risk-free profits by trading (simultaneous buying and selling of the cryptocurrency) on two different exchanges which have different prices for the same asset.
Ashdraked:
Being Ashdraked is essentially a more detailed version of being Zhoutonged. It is when you lose all of your invested capital, but you do so specifically by shorting Bitcoin. The expression “Ashdraked” comes from a story of a Romanian cryptocurrency investor who insisted upon shorting BTC, as he had done so successfully in the past. When the price of BTC rose from USD 300 to USD 500, the Romanian investor lost all of his money.
ATH (All Time High):
The highest price ever achieved by a cryptocurrency in its entire history. Alternatively, ATL is all time low
Bearish:
A tendency of prices to fall; a pessimistic expectation that the value of a coin is going to drop.
Bear trap:
A manipulation of a stock or commodity by investors.
Bitcoin:
The very first, and the highest ever valued, mass-market open source and decentralized cryptocurrency and digital payment system that runs on a worldwide peer to peer network. It operates independently of any centralized authorities
Bitconnect:
One of the biggest scams in the crypto world. it was made popular in the meme world by screaming idiot Carlos Matos, who infamously proclaimed," hey hey heeeey” and “what's a what's a what's up wasssssssssuuuuuuuuuuuuup, BitConneeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeect!”. He is now in the mentally ill meme hall of fame.
Block:
A package of permanently recorded data about transactions occurring every time period (typically about 10 minutes) on the blockchain network. Once a record has been completed and verified, it goes into a blockchain and gives way to the next block. Each block also contains a complex mathematical puzzle with a unique answer, without which new blocks can’t be added to the chain.
Blockchain:
An unchangeable digital record of all transactions ever made in a particular cryptocurrency and shared across thousands of computers worldwide. It has no central authority governing it. Records, or blocks, are chained to each other using a cryptographic signature. They are stored publicly and chronologically, from the genesis block to the latest block, hence the term blockchain. Anyone can have access to the database and yet it remains incredibly difficult to hack.
Bullish:
A tendency of prices to rise; an optimistic expectation that a specific cryptocurrency will do well and its value is going to increase.
BTFD:
Buy the fucking dip. This advise was bestowed upon us by the gods themselves. It is the iron code to crypto enthusiasts.
Bull market:
A market that Cryptos are going up.
Consensus:
An agreement among blockchain participants on the validity of data. Consensus is reached when the majority of nodes on the network verify that the transaction is 100% valid.
Crypto bubble:
The instability of cryptocurrencies in terms of price value
Cryptocurrency:
A type of digital currency, secured by strong computer code (cryptography), that operates independently of any middlemen or central authoritie
Cryptography:
The art of converting sensitive data into a format unreadable for unauthorized users, which when decoded would result in a meaningful statement.
Cryptojacking:
The use of someone else’s device and profiting from its computational power to mine cryptocurrency without their knowledge and consent.
Crypto-Valhalla:
When HODLers(holders) eventually cash out they go to a place called crypto-Valhalla. The strong will be separated from the weak and the strong will then be given lambos.
DAO:
Decentralized Autonomous Organizations. It defines A blockchain technology inspired organization or corporation that exists and operates without human intervention.
Dapp (decentralized application):
An open-source application that runs and stores its data on a blockchain network (instead of a central server) to prevent a single failure point. This software is not controlled by the single body – information comes from people providing other people with data or computing power.
Decentralized:
A system with no fundamental control authority that governs the network. Instead, it is jointly managed by all users to the system.
Desktop wallet:
A wallet that stores the private keys on your computer, which allow the spending and management of your bitcoins.
DILDO:
Long red or green candles. This is a crypto signal that tells you that it is not favorable to trade at the moment. Found on candlestick charts.
Digital Signature:
An encrypted digital code attached to an electronic document to prove that the sender is who they say they are and confirm that a transaction is valid and should be accepted by the network.
Double Spending:
An attack on the blockchain where a malicious user manipulates the network by sending digital money to two different recipients at exactly the same time.
DYOR:
Means do your own research.
Encryption:
Converting data into code to protect it from unauthorized access, so that only the intended recipient(s) can decode it.
Eskrow:
the practice of having a third party act as an intermediary in a transaction. This third party holds the funds on and sends them off when the transaction is completed.
Ethereum:
Ethereum is an open source, public, blockchain-based platform that runs smart contracts and allows you to build dapps on it. Ethereum is fueled by the cryptocurrency Ether.
Exchange:
A platform (centralized or decentralized) for exchanging (trading) different forms of cryptocurrencies. These exchanges allow you to exchange cryptos for local currency. Some popular exchanges are Coinbase, Bittrex, Kraken and more.
Faucet:
A website which gives away free cryptocurrencies.
Fiat money:
Fiat currency is legal tender whose value is backed by the government that issued it, such as the US dollar or UK pound.
Fork:
A split in the blockchain, resulting in two separate branches, an original and a new alternate version of the cryptocurrency. As a single blockchain forks into two, they will both run simultaneously on different parts of the network. For example, Bitcoin Cash is a Bitcoin fork.
FOMO:
Fear of missing out.
Frictionless:
A system is frictionless when there are zero transaction costs or trading retraints.
FUD:
Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt regarding the crypto market.
Gas:
A fee paid to run transactions, dapps and smart contracts on Ethereum.
Halving:
A 50% decrease in block reward after the mining of a pre-specified number of blocks. Every 4 years, the “reward” for successfully mining a block of bitcoin is reduced by half. This is referred to as “Halving”.
Hardware wallet:
Physical wallet devices that can securely store cryptocurrency maximally. Some examples are Ledger Nano S**,** Digital Bitbox and more**.**
Hash:
The process that takes input data of varying sizes, performs an operation on it and converts it into a fixed size output. It cannot be reversed.
Hashing:
The process by which you mine bitcoin or similar cryptocurrency, by trying to solve the mathematical problem within it, using cryptographic hash functions.
HODL:
A Bitcoin enthusiast once accidentally misspelled the word HOLD and it is now part of the bitcoin legend. It can also mean hold on for dear life.
ICO (Initial Coin Offering):
A blockchain-based fundraising mechanism, or a public crowd sale of a new digital coin, used to raise capital from supporters for an early stage crypto venture. Beware of these as there have been quite a few scams in the past.
John mcAfee:
A man who will one day eat his balls on live television for falsely predicting bitcoin going to 100k. He has also become a small meme within the crypto community for his outlandish claims.
JOMO:
Joy of missing out. For those who are so depressed about missing out their sadness becomes joy.
KYC:
Know your customer(alternatively consumer).
Lambo:
This stands for Lamborghini. A small meme within the investing community where the moment someone gets rich they spend their earnings on a lambo. One day we will all have lambos in crypto-valhalla.
Ledger:
Away from Blockchain, it is a book of financial transactions and balances. In the world of crypto, the blockchain functions as a ledger. A digital currency’s ledger records all transactions which took place on a certain block chain network.
Leverage:
Trading with borrowed capital (margin) in order to increase the potential return of an investment.
Liquidity:
The availability of an asset to be bought and sold easily, without affecting its market price.
of the coins.
Margin trading:
The trading of assets or securities bought with borrowed money.
Market cap/MCAP:
A short-term for Market Capitalization. Market Capitalization refers to the market value of a particular cryptocurrency. It is computed by multiplying the Price of an individual unit of coins by the total circulating supply.
Miner:
A computer participating in any cryptocurrency network performing proof of work. This is usually done to receive block rewards.
Mining:
The act of solving a complex math equation to validate a blockchain transaction using computer processing power and specialized hardware.
Mining contract:
A method of investing in bitcoin mining hardware, allowing anyone to rent out a pre-specified amount of hashing power, for an agreed amount of time. The mining service takes care of hardware maintenance, hosting and electricity costs, making it simpler for investors.
Mining rig:
A computer specially designed for mining cryptocurrencies.
Mooning:
A situation the price of a coin rapidly increases in value. Can also be used as: “I hope bitcoin goes to the moon”
Node:
Any computing device that connects to the blockchain network.
Open source:
The practice of sharing the source code for a piece of computer software, allowing it to be distributed and altered by anyone.
OTC:
Over the counter. Trading is done directly between parties.
P2P (Peer to Peer):
A type of network connection where participants interact directly with each other rather than through a centralized third party. The system allows the exchange of resources from A to B, without having to go through a separate server.
Paper wallet:
A form of “cold storage” where the private keys are printed onto a piece of paper and stored offline. Considered as one of the safest crypto wallets, the truth is that it majors in sweeping coins from your wallets.
Pre mining:
The mining of a cryptocurrency by its developers before it is released to the public.
Proof of stake (POS):
A consensus distribution algorithm which essentially rewards you based upon the amount of the coin that you own. In other words, more investment in the coin will leads to more gain when you mine with this protocol In Proof of Stake, the resource held by the “miner” is their stake in the currency.
PROOF OF WORK (POW) :
The competition of computers competing to solve a tough crypto math problem. The first computer that does this is allowed to create new blocks and record information.” The miner is then usually rewarded via transaction fees.
Protocol:
A standardized set of rules for formatting and processing data.
Public key / private key:
A cryptographic code that allows a user to receive cryptocurrencies into an account. The public key is made available to everyone via a publicly accessible directory, and the private key remains confidential to its respective owner. Because the key pair is mathematically related, whatever is encrypted with a public key may only be decrypted by its corresponding private key.
Pump and dump:
Massive buying and selling activity of cryptocurrencies (sometimes organized and to one’s benefit) which essentially result in a phenomenon where the significant surge in the value of coin followed by a huge crash take place in a short time frame.
Recovery phrase:
A set of phrases you are given whereby you can regain or access your wallet should you lose the private key to your wallets — paper, mobile, desktop, and hardware wallet. These phrases are some random 12–24 words. A recovery Phrase can also be called as Recovery seed, Seed Key, Recovery Key, or Seed Phrase.
REKT:
Referring to the word “wrecked”. It defines a situation whereby an investor or trader who has been ruined utterly following the massive losses suffered in crypto industry.
Ripple:
An alternative payment network to Bitcoin based on similar cryptography. The ripple network uses XRP as currency and is capable of sending any asset type.
ROI:
Return on investment.
Safu:
A crypto term for safe popularized by the Bizonnaci YouTube channel after the CEO of Binance tweeted
“Funds are safe."
“the exchage I use got hacked!”“Oh no, are your funds safu?”
“My coins better be safu!”


Sats/Satoshi:
The smallest fraction of a bitcoin is called a “satoshi” or “sat”. It represents one hundred-millionth of a bitcoin and is named after Satoshi Nakamoto.
Satoshi Nakamoto:
This was the pseudonym for the mysterious creator of Bitcoin.
Scalability:
The ability of a cryptocurrency to contain the massive use of its Blockchain.
Sharding:
A scaling solution for the Blockchain. It is generally a method that allows nodes to have partial copies of the complete blockchain in order to increase overall network performance and consensus speeds.
Shitcoin:
Coin with little potential or future prospects.
Shill:
Spreading buzz by heavily promoting a particular coin in the community to create awareness.
Short position:
Selling of a specific cryptocurrency with an expectation that it will drop in value.
Silk road:
The online marketplace where drugs and other illicit items were traded for Bitcoin. This marketplace is using accessed through “TOR”, and VPNs. In October 2013, a Silk Road was shut down in by the FBI.
Smart Contract:
Certain computational benchmarks or barriers that have to be met in turn for money or data to be deposited or even be used to verify things such as land rights.
Software Wallet:
A crypto wallet that exists purely as software files on a computer. Usually, software wallets can be generated for free from a variety of sources.
Solidity:
A contract-oriented coding language for implementing smart contracts on Ethereum. Its syntax is similar to that of JavaScript.
Stable coin:
A cryptocoin with an extremely low volatility that can be used to trade against the overall market.
Staking:
Staking is the process of actively participating in transaction validation (similar to mining) on a proof-of-stake (PoS) blockchain. On these blockchains, anyone with a minimum-required balance of a specific cryptocurrency can validate transactions and earn Staking rewards.
Surge:
When a crypto currency appreciates or goes up in price.
Tank:
The opposite of mooning. When a coin tanks it can also be described as crashing.
Tendies
For traders , the chief prize is “tendies” (chicken tenders, the treat an overgrown man-child receives for being a “Good Boy”) .
Token:
A unit of value that represents a digital asset built on a blockchain system. A token is usually considered as a “coin” of a cryptocurrency, but it really has a wider functionality.
TOR: “The Onion Router” is a free web browser designed to protect users’ anonymity and resist censorship. Tor is usually used surfing the web anonymously and access sites on the “Darkweb”.
Transaction fee:
An amount of money users are charged from their transaction when sending cryptocurrencies.
Volatility:
A measure of fluctuations in the price of a financial instrument over time. High volatility in bitcoin is seen as risky since its shifting value discourages people from spending or accepting it.
Wallet:
A file that stores all your private keys and communicates with the blockchain to perform transactions. It allows you to send and receive bitcoins securely as well as view your balance and transaction history.
Whale:
An investor that holds a tremendous amount of cryptocurrency. Their extraordinary large holdings allow them to control prices and manipulate the market.
Whitepaper:

A comprehensive report or guide made to understand an issue or help decision making. It is also seen as a technical write up that most cryptocurrencies provide to take a deep look into the structure and plan of the cryptocurrency/Blockchain project. Satoshi Nakamoto was the first to release a whitepaper on Bitcoin, titled “Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System” in late 2008.
And with that I finally complete my odyssey. I sincerely hope that this helped you and if you are new, I welcome you to crypto. If you read all of that I hope it increased, you in knowledge.
my final definition:
Crypto-Family:
A collection of all the HODLers and crypto fanatics. A place where all people alike unite over a love for crypto.
We are all in this together as we pioneer the new world that is crypto currency. I wish you a great day and Happy HODLing.
-u/flacciduck
feel free to comment words or terms that you feel should be included or about any errors I made.
Edit1:some fixes were made and added words.
submitted by flacciduck to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Newcomers FAQ - Please read!

Welcome to the /Bitcoin Sticky FAQ

You've probably been hearing a lot about Bitcoin recently and are wondering what's the big deal? Most of your questions should be answered by the resources below but if you have additional questions feel free to ask them in the comments.
It all started with the release of the release of Satoshi Nakamoto's whitepaper however that will probably go over the head of most readers so we recommend the following videos for a good starting point for understanding how bitcoin works and a little about its long term potential:
Some other great resources include Lopp.net, the Princeton crypto series and James D'Angelo's Bitcoin 101 Blackboard series.
Some excellent writing on Bitcoin's value proposition and future can be found at the Satoshi Nakamoto Institute.
Some Bitcoin statistics can be found here and here. Developer resources can be found here. Peer-reviewed research papers can be found here.
Potential upcoming protocol improvements and scaling resources here and here.
The number of times Bitcoin was declared dead by the media can be found here (LOL!)

Key properties of Bitcoin

Where can I buy bitcoins?

Bitcoin.org and BuyBitcoinWorldwide.com are helpful sites for beginners. You can buy or sell any amount of bitcoin (even just a few dollars worth) and there are several easy methods to purchase bitcoin with cash, credit card or bank transfer. Some of the more popular resources are below, also check out the bitcoinity exchange resources for a larger list of options for purchases.
Here is a listing of local ATMs. If you would like your paycheck automatically converted to bitcoin use Bitwage.
Note: Bitcoins are valued at whatever market price people are willing to pay for them in balancing act of supply vs demand. Unlike traditional markets, bitcoin markets operate 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. Preev is a useful site that that shows how much various denominations of bitcoin are worth in different currencies. Alternatively you can just Google "1 bitcoin in (your local currency)".

Securing your bitcoins

With bitcoin you can "Be your own bank" and personally secure your bitcoins OR you can use third party companies aka "Bitcoin banks" which will hold the bitcoins for you.
Note: For increased security, use Two Factor Authentication (2FA) everywhere it is offered, including email!
2FA requires a second confirmation code to access your account making it much harder for thieves to gain access. Google Authenticator and Authy are the two most popular 2FA services, download links are below. Make sure you create backups of your 2FA codes.
Google Auth Authy OTP Auth
Android Android N/A
iOS iOS iOS

Watch out for scams

As mentioned above, Bitcoin is decentralized, which by definition means there is no official website or Twitter handle or spokesperson or CEO. However, all money attracts thieves. This combination unfortunately results in scammers running official sounding names or pretending to be an authority on YouTube or social media. Many scammers throughout the years have claimed to be the inventor of Bitcoin. Websites like bitcoin(dot)com and the btc subreddit are active scams. Almost all altcoins (shitcoins) are marketed heavily with big promises but are really just designed to separate you from your bitcoin. So be careful: any resource, including all linked in this document, may in the future turn evil. Don't trust, verify. Also as they say in our community "Not your keys, not your coins".

Where can I spend bitcoins?

Check out spendabit or bitcoin directory for millions of merchant options. Also you can spend bitcoin anywhere visa is accepted with bitcoin debit cards such as the CashApp card. Some other useful site are listed below.
Store Product
Gyft Gift cards for hundreds of retailers including Amazon, Target, Walmart, Starbucks, Whole Foods, CVS, Lowes, Home Depot, iTunes, Best Buy, Sears, Kohls, eBay, GameStop, etc.
Spendabit, Overstock and The Bitcoin Directory Retail shopping with millions of results
ShakePay Generate one time use Visa cards in seconds
NewEgg and Dell For all your electronics needs
Bitwa.la, Coinbills, Piixpay, Bitbill.eu, Bylls, Coins.ph, Bitrefill, LivingRoomofSatoshi, Coinsfer, and more Bill payment
Menufy, Takeaway and Thuisbezorgd NL Takeout delivered to your door
Expedia, Cheapair, Destinia, Abitsky, SkyTours, the Travel category on Gyft and 9flats For when you need to get away
Cryptostorm, Mullvad, and PIA VPN services
Namecheap, Porkbun Domain name registration
Stampnik Discounted USPS Priority, Express, First-Class mail postage
Coinmap and AirBitz are helpful to find local businesses accepting bitcoins. A good resource for UK residents is at wheretospendbitcoins.co.uk.
There are also lots of charities which accept bitcoin donations.

Merchant Resources

There are several benefits to accepting bitcoin as a payment option if you are a merchant;
If you are interested in accepting bitcoin as a payment method, there are several options available;

Can I mine bitcoin?

Mining bitcoins can be a fun learning experience, but be aware that you will most likely operate at a loss. Newcomers are often advised to stay away from mining unless they are only interested in it as a hobby similar to folding at home. If you want to learn more about mining you can read more here. Still have mining questions? The crew at /BitcoinMining would be happy to help you out.
If you want to contribute to the bitcoin network by hosting the blockchain and propagating transactions you can run a full node using this setup guide. If you would prefer to keep it simple there are several good options. You can view the global node distribution here.

Earning bitcoins

Just like any other form of money, you can also earn bitcoins by being paid to do a job.
Site Description
WorkingForBitcoins, Bitwage, Cryptogrind, Coinality, Bitgigs, /Jobs4Bitcoins, BitforTip, Rein Project Freelancing
Lolli Earn bitcoin when you shop online!
OpenBazaar, Purse.io, Bitify, /Bitmarket, 21 Market Marketplaces
/GirlsGoneBitcoin NSFW Adult services
A-ads, Coinzilla.io Advertising
You can also earn bitcoins by participating as a market maker on JoinMarket by allowing users to perform CoinJoin transactions with your bitcoins for a small fee (requires you to already have some bitcoins.

Bitcoin-Related Projects

The following is a short list of ongoing projects that might be worth taking a look at if you are interested in current development in the bitcoin space.
Project Description
Lightning Network Second layer scaling
Blockstream, Rootstock and Drivechain Sidechains
Hivemind and Augur Prediction markets
Tierion and Factom Records & Titles on the blockchain
BitMarkets, DropZone, Beaver and Open Bazaar Decentralized markets
JoinMarket and Wasabi Wallet CoinJoin implementation
Coinffeine and Bisq Decentralized bitcoin exchanges
Keybase Identity & Reputation management
Abra Global P2P money transmitter network
Bitcore Open source Bitcoin javascript library

Bitcoin Units

One Bitcoin is quite large (hundreds of £/$/€) so people often deal in smaller units. The most common subunits are listed below:
Unit Symbol Value Info
bitcoin BTC 1 bitcoin one bitcoin is equal to 100 million satoshis
millibitcoin mBTC 1,000 per bitcoin used as default unit in recent Electrum wallet releases
bit bit 1,000,000 per bitcoin colloquial "slang" term for microbitcoin (μBTC)
satoshi sat 100,000,000 per bitcoin smallest unit in bitcoin, named after the inventor
For example, assuming an arbitrary exchange rate of $10000 for one Bitcoin, a $10 meal would equal:
For more information check out the Bitcoin units wiki.
Still have questions? Feel free to ask in the comments below or stick around for our weekly Mentor Monday thread. If you decide to post a question in /Bitcoin, please use the search bar to see if it has been answered before, and remember to follow the community rules outlined on the sidebar to receive a better response. The mods are busy helping manage our community so please do not message them unless you notice problems with the functionality of the subreddit.
Note: This is a community created FAQ. If you notice anything missing from the FAQ or that requires clarification you can edit it here and it will be included in the next revision pending approval.
Welcome to the Bitcoin community and the new decentralized economy!
submitted by BitcoinFan7 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What I currently use for privacy (after almost 2 years of long investing into it)

First of all, my threat model: I'm just an average person that wants to AVOID the maximum I can to be monitored and tracked by the government and big corps, a lot of people out there REALLY hate me and I've gone through lots of harassment and other stuff, I also plan to take my activism and love for freedom more seriously and to do stuff that could potentially lead me to very high danger or even put my life on the line. That being said, my main focus is on something that is privacy-friendly but also something with decent security (no point having a lot of privacy if a script kiddie can just break into it an boom, everything is gone) anonymity is also desirable but I'm pretty aware that true 100% anonymity is simply not possible and to achieve the maximum you can of it currently you'd have to give up A LOT of stuff in which I don't think I really could. So basically, everything that I said + I don't want to give up some hobbies of mine (as playing games etc)
Here's what I use/have done so far, most of it is based on privacytools.io list and research I've done.
Mobile:
Google Pixel 3a XL running GrapheneOS
Apps: Stock apps (Vanadium, Gallery, Clock, Contacts etc) + F-DROID, NewPipe, OsmAnd+, Joplin, Tutanota, K-9 Mail, Aegis Authenticator, KeePassDX, Syncthing, Signal, Librera PRO, Vinyl, Open Camera and Wireguard.
I also use BlahDNS as my private DNS.
Other smartphone stuff/habits: I use a Supershieldz Anti Spy Tempered Glass Screen Protector on my phone and I also have a Faraday Sleeve from Silent Pocket which my phone is on most of the times (I don't have smartphone addiction and would likely advice you to break free from smartphone addiction if you have it). I NEVER use bluetooth (thank god Pixel 3a have a headphone jack so yeah, no bluetooth earphones here) and always keep my Wi-Fi off if I'm not using it.
Computer:
I have a desktop that I built (specs: Asus B450M Gaming, AMD Ryzen 3 3300X, Radeon RX 580 8GB, 16GB DDR4 2666Mhz, 3TB HDD, 480GB SSD) that is dualbooted with QubesOS and Arch Linux.
Qubes is my main OS that I use as daily driver and for my tasks, I use Arch for gaming.
I've installed linux-hardened and its headers packages on my Arch + further kernel hardening using systctl and boot parameters, AppArmor as my MAC system and bubblewrap for sandboxing programs. I also spoof my MAC address and have restricted root access, I've also protected my GRUB with password (and use encrypted boot) and have enabled Microcode updates and have NTP and IPV6 disabled.
Also on Arch, I use iptables as a firewall denying all incoming traffic, and since it's my gaming PC, I don't game on the OS, instead, I use a KVM/QEMU Windows VM for gaming (search "How I Built The "Poor-Shamed" Computer" video to see what I'm talking about) I also use full disk encryption.
Software/Providers:
E-Mails: I use ProtonMail (Plus Account paid with bitcoin) and Tutanota (free account as they don't accept crypto payment yet, come on Tutanota, I've been waiting for it for 2 years already) since I have plus account on ProtonMail it allows me to use ProtonMail Bridge and use it on Claws Mail (desktop) and K-9 Mail (mobile) as for Tutanota I use both desktop and mobile app.
Some other e-mails habits of mine: I use e-mail aliases (ProtonMail plus account provides you with 5) and each alias is used for different tasks (as one for shopping, one for banking, one for accounts etc) and none of my e-mails have my real name on it or something that could be used to identify me. I also highly avoid using stuff that require e-mail/e-mail verification for usage (e-mail is such a pain in the ass tbh) I also make use of Spamgourmet for stuff like temporary e-mail (best service I found for this doing my research, dunno if it's really the best tho, heard that AnonAddy does kinda the same stuff but dunno, recommendations are welcomed)
Browsers/Search Engine: As mentioned, I use Vanadium (Graphene's stock browser) on mobile as it is the recommended browser by Graphene and the one with the best security for Android, for desktop I use a Hardened Firefox (pretty aware of Firefox's security not being that good, but it's the best browser for PC for me as Ungoogled Chromium is still not there in A LOT of things + inherent problems of Chrome as not being able to disable WebRTC unless you use an extension etc) with ghacks-user.js and uBlock Origin (hard mode), uMatrix (globally blocking first party scripts), HTTPS Everywhere (EASE Mode), Decentraleyes (set the recommended rules for both uBlock Origin and uMatrix) and Temporary Containers as addons. I also use Tor Browser (Safest Mode) on a Whonix VM on Qubes sometimes. DuckDuckGo is my to-go search engine and I use DNS over HTTPS on Firefox (BlahDNS as my provider once again)
browsing habits: I avoid JavaScript the maximum I can, if it's really needed, I just allow the scripts temporarely on uBlock Origin/uMatrix and after I'm done I just disable it. I also generally go with old.reddit.com instead of reddit.com (as JavaScript is not required to browse the old client), nitter.net for checking twitter stuff (although I rarely have something peaking my interest on Twitter) and I use invidious.snopyta.org as youtube front-end (I do however use YouTube sometimes if a video I wanna see can't be played on invidious or if I wanna watch a livestream) and html.duckduckgo.com instead of duckduckgo.com other than avoiding JavaScript most of my browsing habits are just common sense at this point I'd say, I also use privatebin (snopyta's instance) instead of pastebin. I also have multiple firefox profiles for different tasks (personal usage, shopping, banking etc)
VPN: I use Mullvad (guess you can mention it here since it's PTIO's recommended) paid with bitcoin and honestly best service available tbh. I use Mullvad's multihop implementation on Wireguard which I manually set myself as I had the time and patience to learn how.
password manager: KeePassXC on desktop and KeePassDX on my smartphone, my password database for my desktop is stored on a USB flash driver I encrypted with VeraCrypt.
some other software on desktop: LibreOffice (as a Microsoft Office substitute), GIMP (Photshop substitute), Vim (I use it for multiple purposes, mainly coding IDE and as a text editor), VLC (media player), Bisq (bitcoin exchange), Wasabi (bitcoin wallet), OBS (screen recording), Syncthing (file sync), qBitTorrent (torrent client) and Element (federated real-time communication software). I sadly couldn't find a good open-source substitute to Sony Vegas (tested many, but none was in the same level of Vegas imo, KDENLive is okay tho) so I just use it on a VM if I need it (Windows VM solely for the purpose of video editing, not the same one I use for gaming)
Other:
router: I have an Asus RT-AC68U with OpenWRT as its firmware. I also set a VPN on it.
cryptocurrency hardware wallet: I store all of my cryptocurrency (Bitcoin and Monero) on a Ledger Nano S, about 97% of my money is on crypto so a hardware wallet is a must for me.
I have lots of USB flash drivers that I use for Live ISOs and for encrypted backups. I also have a USB Data Blocker from PortaPow that I generally use if I need to charge my cellphone in public or in a hotel while on a trip (rare occasion tbh).
I have a Logitech C920e as webcam and a Blue Yeti microphone in which I never let them plugged, I only plug them if it's necessary and after I'm done I just unplug them.
I also have a Nintendo Switch Lite as a gaming console that I most of the times just use offline, I just connect to the internet if needed for a software update and then just turn the Wi-Fi off from it.
Other Habits/Things I've done:
payments: I simply AVOID using credit card, I try to always pay on cash (I live in a third-world country so thank god most of people here still depend on cash only) physically and online I try my best to either by using cryptocurrency or using gift cards/cash by mail if crypto isn't available. I usually buy crypto on Bisq as I just don't trust any KYC exchange (and neither should you) and since there aren't many people here in my area to do face to face bitcoin trade (and I'm skeptical of face to face tbh), I use the Wasabi Wallet (desktop) to coinjoin bitcoin before buying anything as this allows a bit more of privacy, I also coinjoin on Wasabi before sending my bitcoins to my hardware wallet. I also don't have a high consumerism drive so I'm not constantly wanting to buy everything that I see (which helps a lot on this criteria)
social media/accounts: as noted, aside from Signal and Element (which I don't even use that often) I just don't REALLY use any social media (tried Mastodon for a while but I was honestly felt it kinda desert there and most of its userbase from what I've seen were some people I'd just... rather don't hang with tbh) and, althoug not something necessary is something that I really advise people to as social media is literally a poison to your mind.
I also don't own any streaming service like Netflix/Amazon Prime/Spotify etc, I basically pirate series/movies/songs and that's it.
I've also deleted ALL my old accounts from social media (like Twitter etc) and old e-mails. ALL of my important and main accounts have 2FA enabled and are protected by a strong password (I use KeePass to generate a 35 character lenght password with numbers, capital letters, special symbols etc, each account uses a unique password) I also NEVER use my real name on any account and NEVER post any pictures of myself (I rarely take pictures of stuff if anything)
iot/smart devices: aside from my smartphone, I don't have any IOT/smart device as I honestly see no need for them (and most of them are WAY too expensive on third-world countries)
files: I constatly backup all of my files (each two weeks) on encrypted flash drivers, I also use BleachBit for temporary data cleaning and data/file shredding. I also use Syncthing as a substitute to stuff like Google Drive.
Future plans:
learn to self-host and self-host an e-mail/NextCloud (and maybe even a VPN)
find something like BurneHushed but FOSS (if you know any please let me know)
So, how is it? anything that I should do that I'm probably not doing?
submitted by StunningDistrust to privacytoolsIO [link] [comments]

Technical: Taproot: Why Activate?

This is a follow-up on https://old.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/hqzp14/technical_the_path_to_taproot_activation/
Taproot! Everybody wants it!! But... you might ask yourself: sure, everybody else wants it, but why would I, sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, want it? Surely I can be better than everybody else because I swapped XXX fiat for Bitcoin unlike all those nocoiners?
And it is important for you to know the reasons why you, o sovereign Bitcoiner, would want Taproot activated. After all, your nodes (or the nodes your wallets use, which if you are SPV, you hopefully can pester to your wallet vendoimplementor about) need to be upgraded in order for Taproot activation to actually succeed instead of becoming a hot sticky mess.
First, let's consider some principles of Bitcoin.
I'm sure most of us here would agree that the above are very important principles of Bitcoin and that these are principles we would not be willing to remove. If anything, we would want those principles strengthened (especially the last one, financial privacy, which current Bitcoin is only sporadically strong with: you can get privacy, it just requires effort to do so).
So, how does Taproot affect those principles?

Taproot and Your /Coins

Most HODLers probably HODL their coins in singlesig addresses. Sadly, switching to Taproot would do very little for you (it gives a mild discount at spend time, at the cost of a mild increase in fee at receive time (paid by whoever sends to you, so if it's a self-send from a P2PKH or bech32 address, you pay for this); mostly a wash).
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash, so the Taproot output spends 12 bytes more; spending from a P2WPKH requires revealing a 32-byte public key later, which is not needed with Taproot, and Taproot signatures are about 9 bytes smaller than P2WPKH signatures, but the 32 bytes plus 9 bytes is divided by 4 because of the witness discount, so it saves about 11 bytes; mostly a wash, it increases blockweight by about 1 virtual byte, 4 weight for each Taproot-output-input, compared to P2WPKH-output-input).
However, as your HODLings grow in value, you might start wondering if multisignature k-of-n setups might be better for the security of your savings. And it is in multisignature that Taproot starts to give benefits!
Taproot switches to using Schnorr signing scheme. Schnorr makes key aggregation -- constructing a single public key from multiple public keys -- almost as trivial as adding numbers together. "Almost" because it involves some fairly advanced math instead of simple boring number adding, but hey when was the last time you added up your grocery list prices by hand huh?
With current P2SH and P2WSH multisignature schemes, if you have a 2-of-3 setup, then to spend, you need to provide two different signatures from two different public keys. With Taproot, you can create, using special moon math, a single public key that represents your 2-of-3 setup. Then you just put two of your devices together, have them communicate to each other (this can be done airgapped, in theory, by sending QR codes: the software to do this is not even being built yet, but that's because Taproot hasn't activated yet!), and they will make a single signature to authorize any spend from your 2-of-3 address. That's 73 witness bytes -- 18.25 virtual bytes -- of signatures you save!
And if you decide that your current setup with 1-of-1 P2PKH / P2WPKH addresses is just fine as-is: well, that's the whole point of a softfork: backwards-compatibility; you can receive from Taproot users just fine, and once your wallet is updated for Taproot-sending support, you can send to Taproot users just fine as well!
(P2WPKH and P2WSH -- SegWit v0 -- addresses start with bc1q; Taproot -- SegWit v1 --- addresses start with bc1p, in case you wanted to know the difference; in bech32 q is 0, p is 1)
Now how about HODLers who keep all, or some, of their coins on custodial services? Well, any custodial service worth its salt would be doing at least 2-of-3, or probably something even bigger, like 11-of-15. So your custodial service, if it switched to using Taproot internally, could save a lot more (imagine an 11-of-15 getting reduced from 11 signatures to just 1!), which --- we can only hope! --- should translate to lower fees and better customer service from your custodial service!
So I think we can say, very accurately, that the Bitcoin principle --- that YOU are in control of your money --- can only be helped by Taproot (if you are doing multisignature), and, because P2PKH and P2WPKH remain validly-usable addresses in a Taproot future, will not be harmed by Taproot. Its benefit to this principle might be small (it mostly only benefits multisignature users) but since it has no drawbacks with this (i.e. singlesig users can continue to use P2WPKH and P2PKH still) this is still a nice, tidy win!
(even singlesig users get a minor benefit, in that multisig users will now reduce their blockchain space footprint, so that fees can be kept low for everybody; so for example even if you have your single set of private keys engraved on titanium plates sealed in an airtight box stored in a safe buried in a desert protected by angry nomads riding giant sandworms because you're the frickin' Kwisatz Haderach, you still gain some benefit from Taproot)
And here's the important part: if P2PKH/P2WPKH is working perfectly fine with you and you decide to never use Taproot yourself, Taproot will not affect you detrimentally. First do no harm!

Taproot and Your Contracts

No one is an island, no one lives alone. Give and you shall receive. You know: by trading with other people, you can gain expertise in some obscure little necessity of the world (and greatly increase your productivity in that little field), and then trade the products of your expertise for necessities other people have created, all of you thereby gaining gains from trade.
So, contracts, which are basically enforceable agreements that facilitate trading with people who you do not personally know and therefore might not trust.
Let's start with a simple example. You want to buy some gewgaws from somebody. But you don't know them personally. The seller wants the money, you want their gewgaws, but because of the lack of trust (you don't know them!! what if they're scammers??) neither of you can benefit from gains from trade.
However, suppose both of you know of some entity that both of you trust. That entity can act as a trusted escrow. The entity provides you security: this enables the trade, allowing both of you to get gains from trade.
In Bitcoin-land, this can be implemented as a 2-of-3 multisignature. The three signatories in the multisgnature would be you, the gewgaw seller, and the escrow. You put the payment for the gewgaws into this 2-of-3 multisignature address.
Now, suppose it turns out neither of you are scammers (whaaaat!). You receive the gewgaws just fine and you're willing to pay up for them. Then you and the gewgaw seller just sign a transaction --- you and the gewgaw seller are 2, sufficient to trigger the 2-of-3 --- that spends from the 2-of-3 address to a singlesig the gewgaw seller wants (or whatever address the gewgaw seller wants).
But suppose some problem arises. The seller gave you gawgews instead of gewgaws. Or you decided to keep the gewgaws but not sign the transaction to release the funds to the seller. In either case, the escrow is notified, and if it can sign with you to refund the funds back to you (if the seller was a scammer) or it can sign with the seller to forward the funds to the seller (if you were a scammer).
Taproot helps with this: like mentioned above, it allows multisignature setups to produce only one signature, reducing blockchain space usage, and thus making contracts --- which require multiple people, by definition, you don't make contracts with yourself --- is made cheaper (which we hope enables more of these setups to happen for more gains from trade for everyone, also, moon and lambos).
(technology-wise, it's easier to make an n-of-n than a k-of-n, making a k-of-n would require a complex setup involving a long ritual with many communication rounds between the n participants, but an n-of-n can be done trivially with some moon math. You can, however, make what is effectively a 2-of-3 by using a three-branch SCRIPT: either 2-of-2 of you and seller, OR 2-of-2 of you and escrow, OR 2-of-2 of escrow and seller. Fortunately, Taproot adds a facility to embed a SCRIPT inside a public key, so you can have a 2-of-2 Taprooted address (between you and seller) with a SCRIPT branch that can instead be spent with 2-of-2 (you + escrow) OR 2-of-2 (seller + escrow), which implements the three-branched SCRIPT above. If neither of you are scammers (hopefully the common case) then you both sign using your keys and never have to contact the escrow, since you are just using the escrow public key without coordinating with them (because n-of-n is trivial but k-of-n requires setup with communication rounds), so in the "best case" where both of you are honest traders, you also get a privacy boost, in that the escrow never learns you have been trading on gewgaws, I mean ewww, gawgews are much better than gewgaws and therefore I now judge you for being a gewgaw enthusiast, you filthy gewgawer).

Taproot and Your Contracts, Part 2: Cryptographic Boogaloo

Now suppose you want to buy some data instead of things. For example, maybe you have some closed-source software in trial mode installed, and want to pay the developer for the full version. You want to pay for an activation code.
This can be done, today, by using an HTLC. The developer tells you the hash of the activation code. You pay to an HTLC, paying out to the developer if it reveals the preimage (the activation code), or refunding the money back to you after a pre-agreed timeout. If the developer claims the funds, it has to reveal the preimage, which is the activation code, and you can now activate your software. If the developer does not claim the funds by the timeout, you get refunded.
And you can do that, with HTLCs, today.
Of course, HTLCs do have problems:
Fortunately, with Schnorr (which is enabled by Taproot), we can now use the Scriptless Script constuction by Andrew Poelstra. This Scriptless Script allows a new construction, the PTLC or Pointlocked Timelocked Contract. Instead of hashes and preimages, just replace "hash" with "point" and "preimage" with "scalar".
Or as you might know them: "point" is really "public key" and "scalar" is really a "private key". What a PTLC does is that, given a particular public key, the pointlocked branch can be spent only if the spender reveals the private key of the given public key to you.
Another nice thing with PTLCs is that they are deniable. What appears onchain is just a single 2-of-2 signature between you and the developemanufacturer. It's like a magic trick. This signature has no special watermarks, it's a perfectly normal signature (the pledge). However, from this signature, plus some datta given to you by the developemanufacturer (known as the adaptor signature) you can derive the private key of a particular public key you both agree on (the turn). Anyone scraping the blockchain will just see signatures that look just like every other signature, and as long as nobody manages to hack you and get a copy of the adaptor signature or the private key, they cannot get the private key behind the public key (point) that the pointlocked branch needs (the prestige).
(Just to be clear, the public key you are getting the private key from, is distinct from the public key that the developemanufacturer will use for its funds. The activation key is different from the developer's onchain Bitcoin key, and it is the activation key whose private key you will be learning, not the developer's/manufacturer's onchain Bitcoin key).
So:
Taproot lets PTLCs exist onchain because they enable Schnorr, which is a requirement of PTLCs / Scriptless Script.
(technology-wise, take note that Scriptless Script works only for the "pointlocked" branch of the contract; you need normal Script, or a pre-signed nLockTimed transaction, for the "timelocked" branch. Since Taproot can embed a script, you can have the Taproot pubkey be a 2-of-2 to implement the Scriptless Script "pointlocked" branch, then have a hidden script that lets you recover the funds with an OP_CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY after the timeout if the seller does not claim the funds.)

Quantum Quibbles!

Now if you were really paying attention, you might have noticed this parenthetical:
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash...)
So wait, Taproot uses raw 32-byte public keys, and not public key hashes? Isn't that more quantum-vulnerable??
Well, in theory yes. In practice, they probably are not.
It's not that hashes can be broken by quantum computes --- they're still not. Instead, you have to look at how you spend from a P2WPKH/P2PKH pay-to-public-key-hash.
When you spend from a P2PKH / P2WPKH, you have to reveal the public key. Then Bitcoin hashes it and checks if this matches with the public-key-hash, and only then actually validates the signature for that public key.
So an unconfirmed transaction, floating in the mempools of nodes globally, will show, in plain sight for everyone to see, your public key.
(public keys should be public, that's why they're called public keys, LOL)
And if quantum computers are fast enough to be of concern, then they are probably fast enough that, in the several minutes to several hours from broadcast to confirmation, they have already cracked the public key that is openly broadcast with your transaction. The owner of the quantum computer can now replace your unconfirmed transaction with one that pays the funds to itself. Even if you did not opt-in RBF, miners are still incentivized to support RBF on RBF-disabled transactions.
So the extra hash is not as significant a protection against quantum computers as you might think. Instead, the extra hash-and-compare needed is just extra validation effort.
Further, if you have ever, in the past, spent from the address, then there exists already a transaction indelibly stored on the blockchain, openly displaying the public key from which quantum computers can derive the private key. So those are still vulnerable to quantum computers.
For the most part, the cryptographers behind Taproot (and Bitcoin Core) are of the opinion that quantum computers capable of cracking Bitcoin pubkeys are unlikely to appear within a decade or two.
So:
For now, the homomorphic and linear properties of elliptic curve cryptography provide a lot of benefits --- particularly the linearity property is what enables Scriptless Script and simple multisignature (i.e. multisignatures that are just 1 signature onchain). So it might be a good idea to take advantage of them now while we are still fairly safe against quantum computers. It seems likely that quantum-safe signature schemes are nonlinear (thus losing these advantages).

Summary

I Wanna Be The Taprooter!

So, do you want to help activate Taproot? Here's what you, mister sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, can do!

But I Hate Taproot!!

That's fine!

Discussions About Taproot Activation

submitted by almkglor to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Checker Thread (A list of hacked clients for easy reference)

Community contribution is the only way this thread will be useful. This is a WIP! More clients will be added as time goes on!
Quick note: The vast majority of these are files supplied by the community -- some may not work. The person who sent me 9b9t says it doesn't work, but I have not personally tested. Please let me know if it works or does not work.

Some additional notes:
I am open to community criticism so long as it can actually be used to benefit the thread. Issues with formatting, approach, client choice, etc. are all great things to come talk to me about so I may improve. However, people keep commenting the same things over and over and over — “VirusTotal can’t catch X” is a popular one — and I don’t have time to deal with it. If you have a security concern, you are more than welcome to raise it. HOWEVER, do not make unreasonable requests of me — I work, in addition to that I have a social life, I have responsibilities at home as well. This is a side thing that I do when I have the time. A lot of people have suggested looking through bytecode to determine if a client is malicious. I do not have the time to do this for every client. If you are willing to help and do more than say “you should do more than you already are, even though you have a job and a life outside of an obscure subreddit,” feel free to DM me. People who take the broken record approach and say things that are already covered in the thread, or refuse to offer help and just post complaints, will be blocked and ignored. I’m all down for making this post better, but I’m not gonna waste my time with people who won’t work with me. Thank you for your help!

BIG THANKS TO u/jpie726 FOR HIS MASSIVE CONTRIBUTIONS! WITHOUT HIM THIS LIST WOULD BE SIGNIFICANTLY LESS EXPANSIVE. GO UPVOTE THIS MAN INTO HEAVEN, HE DESERVES IT!

Eventually I would like to make a Python script that takes care of all the necessary tasks to install these clients. Python itself is available through the Windows Store as well as on Python's website, or through various other installers. It will install any additional dependencies via Pip and will use Curl to retrieve the files. Anyone interested in helping with this script is more than welcome to do so, if you wish. The two options for assisting me would be as follows:
1. You can install Visual Studio Code or Atom and work with me directly through those applications (more details soon™)
2. A GitHub page may be made and you could submit pull requests through that and edit the script alone.

#######################################################################
There is a misconception that I am only here for free paid clients.
1. I can't use a paid client unless I have access to a cracked version, an account, and the HWID bound to said account.
2. People are also saying there's a way for clients to track if someone leaks them. While I suppose this is possible if they bothered to put in the absurd amount of effort it would take, it would give them no benefit and it would do no good as I am not running the software on my desktop -- I am sending the software to VirusTotal, grabbing the SHA-256 checksum, and deleting the file.
3. If all you're going to do is post that "VirusTotal can't catch x" or "muh client" do not waste my time, and don't waste yours. You will be ignored in favor of people who will actually help me construct what I hope to be a megathread for this subreddit, FOR YOU GUYS. I mean jeez, someone's trying to help and half the fucking responses are "muh client" like come on. No wonder this fucking subreddit is dead, sheesh. If someone's trying to help you and you just step on their toes that's just not very cool, not everyone is trying to scam you. I do just be trying to help people who come here doe.
4. If you have concerns, raise them respectfully. Do not attack me, you will be ignored or if I feel so inclined I will give you 110% of the shit you give me right back to you. I will answer questions, I will elaborate on my goals, I will take helpful advice. Everything else will be outright ignored, and misinformation will be countered. That is all, thread below.
#######################################################################

I named this the Checker Thread to make it easy to search for in the subreddit. Enjoy.Below will be a list of hacked clients, with VirusTotal links, SHA-256 hashes, direct download links (skipping ad pages) and eventually features for each client. I'd also like to add what servers they do and don't work on, but I need the community to help with that.
The only client I use is Impact, send me additional clients in the comments and they will be added to this list.

Note about SHA-256 hashes:
SHA-256 hashes are a hash of a file produced algorithmically. This type of hash was developed by the United States National Security Agency, and is typically used to verify that files are what they are supposed to be. Widely used in cryptographic applications such as SSH, APT repositories, transactions on websites, verifying files, Bitcoin, and more. It is very common. This type of cryptographic hash has been in use since 2001. An SHA-256 hash will be the exact same for the same file regardless of the source of the file, so if your hash is different from the one listed here you do not have the legitimate installer OR the hash is not up-to-date.

Note about VirusTotal tests:
Several people have pointed out to me something I feel should be brought up in the main thread. VirusTotal is not a catch-all, just as your typical antivirus software is not a catch-all. It will not catch everything. It should be used as a general guideline only. Clean VirusTotal tests do not guarantee your safety, although if the program passes all ~70 or so antivirus engines it's probably safe to use. Any additional malicious activity should be caught by your antivirus program's heuristics. I take no responsibility for anything that is malicious, but I can say in good conscience that I have done everything I can to ensure that everything on this thread is safe. Keep in mind that programs that trip VirusTotal may still be safe to use, antivirus programs often pick up injectors as malware or Trojans because that's how those types of viruses behave in the real world. Use your best judgement. If your best judgement is not good enough, do not use these programs. You have been warned.

----- C --- L --- I --- E --- N --- T--- S ------ C --- L --- I --- E --- N --- T--- S ------ C --- L --- I --- E --- N --- T--- S -----

Impact | 1.11.2 to 1.15.2 | Java Edition
VirusTotal Link for *.exe Installer | VirusTotal Link for *.jar Installer
SHA-256 Hash: 4EAFFB99759FBD949D0FBEF58AE9CEB45CE8CA2B0D7DC22147D4FF0E46F010EC
Impact triggered 0/72 engines on both installers.
Direct Link to Impact's *.exe Installer | Direct Link to Impact's *.jar Installer
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Sigma | 1.8 to 1.16 | Java Edition
VirusTotal Link for *.jar Installer | VirusTotal Link for the *.zip the Installer is Contained In
SHA-256 Hash for the *.zip file: 3FCD397849358522BF0EEEAF117487DBA860919900A904551DF512BE2C34B48C
Sigma's *.zip file triggered 0/59 engines on the *.zip file.
Sigma's *.jar file triggered 0/60 engines on the *.jar file.
Direct Link to Sigma's *.zip File that Contains the Installer
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9b9t | 1.12.2, needs testing | Java Edition | Forge Mod
VirusTotal Link for the *.jar Forge Mod
SHA-256 Hash: 30E4F2778688D54CE7992AFDE509460A7BDDBDA77800219083D4D12BC696EEA0
9b9t triggered 0/60 engines.
AnonFile link to 9b9t's *.jar Mod
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Ingrosware | 1.12.2 | Java Edition | Forge Mod
VirusTotal Link for the *.jar Forge Mod
SHA-256 Hash: BD1A0F9079F4C834A251163C3A0ECBFF7DFC28AB00CF1C74008AADD042FAD358
Ingrosware triggered 0/59 engines.
AnonFile link to a pre-built *.jar Mod
Note: Ingrosware is open source, and is available on GitHub. If you want to build it yourself, you can do so here.
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Mercury | 1.12.2 | Java Edition | Forge Mod
VirusTotal Link for the *.jar Forge Mod
SHA-256 Hash: 70E585A94218149970410ACAE5BE7C1C1B731140F1AF55FE2D1292B1CA74DCB9
Mercury triggered 0/60 engines.
AnonFile link to Mercury's *.jar Mod
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Atlas | 1.12.2 | Java Edition | Forge Mod | Use with caution!
VirusTotal Link for the *.jar Forge Mod
SHA-256 Hash: 7AEB7220CBD5D7C4E4421A940357F14EC70B18DB905469E288529FE3A2C04D57
Note: The file is called AceHackGold-n3.0-release.jar in VirusTotal. The client is identified as Atlas in the .nfo file it came bundled with.
Atlas triggered 7/59 engines.
Note: Upon closer inspection of the VirusTotal scan, the client appears to be of the injected flavor. Injectors are commonly a false positive Trojan. The client appears to be safe, and there was nothing particularly noteworthy in the VirusTotal scan that is atypical for an injector. While this makes the file appear to be safe, use with caution.
AnonFile Link for the *.jar Mod
Note: This is a cracked client! The crack is pre-done, so no additional work is required to use -- just put it in your Forge Mods folder and click play.
Note 2: The file downloaded is called AceHackGold-n3.0-release.jar*, I'm not sure why. This file was community-sourced, but it has been inspected in the same manner as all the others*.
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Atom | 1.12.2 | Java Edition | Forge Mod | Use with extreme caution!
VirusTotal Link for the *.zip the Forge Mod is Contained In
SHA-256 Hash: 3B43F952EB5B14F2B01592057B27E92B0E38B6874EA10B8E893BFCBC71463377
Note: The file is called output.157312297.txt in VirusTotal. In addition, VirusTotal identifies the file type properly (\.zip).*
Atom triggered 9/59 engines.
Note: Upon closer inspection of the VirusTotal scan, the client accesses numerous registry keys, which is a behavior I personally would consider to be unnecessary and incredibly suspicious. You can find more information in the VirusTotal scan. The client also exhibits typical Trojan false-positives.
AnonFile Link for the *.zip File
Note: This is a cracked client! The crack is pre-done, so no additional work is required to use -- just put it in your Forge Mods folder and click play.
Use this client with extreme caution. There are behaviors that I consider to be extremely suspicious, you must determine for yourself if it's safe to use however. This may just be how the client works. I do not know, and I can't be bothered to test it.
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Aurora | 1.12.2 | Java Edition | Forge Mod
VirusTotal Link for the *.zip the Forge Mod is Contained In
SHA-256 Hash: 9A66929B629AB076383340D33E0EF9B8CE221679EF79315240EA6C760651A533
Aurora triggered 0/61 engines.
AnonFile Link for the *.zip File
Note: This is a cracked client! The crack is pre-done, so no additional work is required to use -- just put it in your Forge Mods folder and click play.
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CandyCat | 1.12.2 | Java Edition | Forge Mod | Use with caution!
VirusTotal Link for the *.zip the Forge Mod is Contained In
SHA-256 Hash: 8CEC2F9F28AA3957504E0CC66BF1516080C7BAC50EADB54DC6DD97E0E6E9C745
CandyCat triggered 9/61 engines.
Note: Upon closer inspection of the VirusTotal scan, the client appears to be of the injected flavor. Injectors are commonly a false positive Trojan. The client appears to be safe, and there was nothing particularly noteworthy in the VirusTotal scan that is atypical for an injector. While this makes the file appear to be safe, use with caution.
AnonFile Link for the *.zip File
Note: This is a cracked client! The crack is pre-done, so no additional work is required to use -- just put it in your Forge Mods folder and click play.
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DayNightGod | 1.12.2 | Java Edition | Forge Mod | Use with caution!
VirusTotal Link for the *.zip the Forge Mod is Contained In
SHA-256 Hash: 9CEEB43476B18149C0DA76B7AE94713AAF60ED4D2BFD2339E863CC46A1808A0D
DayNightGod triggered 1/59 engines.
Note: Upon closer inspection, only one engine was triggered. The client did not trigger the usual false-positives of a Trojan, use with caution.
AnonFile Link for the *.zip File
Note: This is a cracked client! The crack is pre-done, so no additional work is required to use -- just put it in your Forge Mods folder and click play.
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HyperLethal | 1.12.2 | Java Edition | Forge Mod | Use with caution!
VirusTotal Link for the *.zip the Forge Mod is Contained In
SHA-256 Hash: 77FACC1FDB0415438963CCC8DDB4081958563AAA962CE9C024E5063DA32E8FAD
HyperLethal triggered 2/59 engines.
Note: Upon closer inspection of the VirusTotal scan, the client appears to be of the injected flavor. Injectors are commonly a false positive Trojan. The client appears to be safe, and there was nothing particularly noteworthy in the VirusTotal scan that is atypical for an injector. While this makes the file appear to be safe, use with caution.
AnonFile Link for the *.zip File
Note: This is a cracked client! The crack is pre-done, so no additional work is required to use -- just put it in your Forge Mods folder and click play.
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LoveClient | 1.12.2 | Java Edition | Forge Mod | Use with extreme caution!
VirusTotal Link for the *.zip the Forge Mod is Contained In
SHA-256 Hash: C71EC42FF612D75CB7AA21B8400D164A74AAD9BB65D2DFEE232461DAF98034C2
LoveClient triggered 9/61 engines.
Note: Upon closer inspection of the VirusTotal scan, the client accesses numerous registry keys, which is a behavior I personally would consider to be unnecessary and incredibly suspicious. You can find more information in the VirusTotal scan. The client also exhibits typical Trojan false-positives.
AnonFile Link for the *.zip File
Use this client with extreme caution. There are behaviors that I consider to be extremely suspicious, you must determine for yourself if it's safe to use however. This may just be how the client works. I do not know, and I can't be bothered to test it.
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SnowHack | 1.12.2 | Java Edition | Forge Mod
VirusTotal Link for the *.zip the Forge Mod is Contained In
SHA-256 Hash: 7100C8D59CE06B279F7D03D834FC2C361F10BEAE913575FC7EFA74E498167D2C
SnowHack triggered 10/62 engines.
Note: Upon closer inspection of the VirusTotal scan, the client appears to be of the injected flavor. Injectors are commonly a false positive Trojan. The client appears to be safe, and there was nothing particularly noteworthy in the VirusTotal scan that is atypical for an injector. While this makes the file appear to be safe, use with caution.
AnonFile Link for the *.zip File
Note: This is a cracked client! The crack is pre-done, so no additional work is required to use -- just put it in your Forge Mods folder and click play.
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submitted by Daemris to minecraftclients [link] [comments]

NEAR PROJECT REPORT

NEAR PROJECT REPORT
Author: Gamals Ahmed, CoinEx Business Ambassador
https://preview.redd.it/xbnvecjn71t51.png?width=1164&format=png&auto=webp&s=acfd141ead035ee156f218eec9fc41288142a922

ABSTRACT

The effects of the web by a number of companies have seduced a large number of users as these companies keep their data to prevent them from searching for alternatives. Likewise, these huge platforms have attracted applications to build their highest ecosystems before either severing access or actively opposing their interests when the applications became so successful. As a result, these walled gardens have effectively hindered innovation and monopolized large sections of the web. After the emergence of blockchain technology and decentralized cryptocurrencies, the need for applications to support decentralization has emerged. Several blockchain-based companies, applications and platforms have appeared in decentralization. In this research report, we will explain the approach adopted by the NEAR decentralization platform in designing and implementing the basic technology for its system. Near is a basic platform for cloud computing and decentralized storage managed by the community, designed to enable the open web for the future. On this web, everything can be created from new currencies to new applications to new industries, opening the door to an entirely new future.

1. INTRODUCTION

The richness of the web is increasing day by day with the combined efforts of millions of people who have benefited from “innovation without permission” as content and applications are created without asking anyone. this lack of freedom of data has led to an environment hostile to the interests of its participants. And as we explained in the summary previously, web hosting companies have hindered innovation and greatly monopolized the web.
In the future, we can fix this by using new technologies to re-enable the permissionless innovation of the past in a way, which creates a more open web where users are free and applications are supportive rather than adversarial to their interests.
Decentralization emerged after the global financial crisis in 2008, which created fundamental problems of confidence in the heavily indebted banking system. Then the decentralized financial sector based on Blockchain technology has emerged since 2009.
Decentralized Blockchain technology has made it easy for decentralized digital currencies like Bitcoin to exchange billions of dollars in peer-to-peer transfers for a fraction of the price of a traditional banking system. This technology allows participants in the over $ 50 billion virtual goods economy to track, own and trade in these commodities without permission. It allows real-world goods to cross into the digital domain, with verified ownership and tracking just like that of the digital.
By default, the Internet where freedom of data enables innovation will lead to the development of a new form of software development. On this web, developers can quickly create applications from open state components and boost their efforts by using new business models that are enabled from within the program itself rather than relying on parasitic relationships with their users. This not only accelerates the creation of applications that have a more honest and cooperative relationship with its users, but also allows the emergence of completely new business built on them.
To enable these new applications and the open web, it needs the appropriate infrastructure. The new web platform cannot be controlled by a single entity and its use is not limited due to insufficient scalability. It should be decentralized in design like the web itself and supported by a community of distributors widely so that the value they store cannot be monitored, modified or removed without permission from the users who store this value on their behalf.
A new decentralization technology (Blockchain), which has facilitated decentralized digital currencies like Bitcoin, has made billions of dollars in peer-to-peer transfers at a fraction of the price of the traditional banking system. This technology allows participants in the $ 50 billion + virtual goods economy to track, own and trade in these goods without permission. It allows real-world goods to cross into the digital domain, with verified ownership and tracking just like that of the digital.
Although the cost of storing data or performing a calculation on the Ethereum blockchain is thousands and millions of times higher than the cost of performing the same functionality on Amazon Web Services. A developer can always create a “central” app or even a central currency for a fraction of the cost of doing the same on a decentralized platform because a decentralized platform, by definition, will have many iterations in its operations and storage.
Bitcoin can be thought of as the first, very basic, version of this global community-run cloud, though it is primarily used only to store and move the Bitcoin digital currency.
Ethereum is the second and slightly more sophisticated version, which expanded the basic principles of Bitcoin to create a more general computing and storage platform, though it is a raw technology, which hasn’t achieved meaningful mainstream adoption.

1.1 WHY IS IT IMPORTANT TO PAY THE EXTRA COST TO SUPPORT DECENTRALIZATION?

Because some elements of value, for example bits representing digital currency ownership, personal identity, or asset notes, are very sensitive. While in the central system, the following players can change the value of any credits they come into direct contact with:
  1. The developer who controls the release or update of the application’s code
  2. The platform where the data is stored
  3. The servers which run the application’s code
Even if none of these players intend to operate with bad faith, the actions of governments, police forces and hackers can easily turn their hands against their users and censor, modify or steal the balances they are supposed to protect.
A typical user will trust a typical centralized application, despite its potential vulnerabilities, with everyday data and computation. Typically, only banks and governments are trusted sufficiently to maintain custody of the most sensitive information — balances of wealth and identity. But these entities are also subject to the very human forces of hubris, corruption and theft.
Especially after the 2008 global financial crisis, which demonstrated the fundamental problems of confidence in a highly indebted banking system. And governments around the
world apply significant capital controls to citizens during times of crisis. After these examples, it has become a truism that hackers now own most or all of your sensitive data.
These decentralized applications operate on a more complex infrastructure than today’s web but they have access to an instantaneous and global pool of currency, value and information that today’s web, where data is stored in the silos of individual corporations, cannot provide.

1.2 THE CHALLENGES OF CREATING A DECENTRALIZED CLOUD

A community-run system like this has very different challenges from centralized “cloud” infrastructure, which is running by a single entity or group of known entities. For example:
  1. It must be both inclusive to anyone and secure from manipulation or capture.
  2. Participants must be fairly compensated for their work while avoiding creating incentives for negligent or malicious behavior.
  3. It must be both game theoretically secure so good actors find the right equilibrium and resistant to manipulation so bad actors are actively prevented from negatively affecting the system.

2. NEAR

NEAR is a global community-run computing and storage cloud which is organized to be permissionless and which is economically incentivized to create a strong and decentralized data layer for the new web.
Essentially, it is a platform for running applications which have access to a shared — and secure — pool of money, identity and data which is owned by their users. More technically, it combines the features of partition-resistant networking, serverless compute and distributed storage into a new kind of platform.
NEAR is a community-managed, decentralized cloud storage and computing platform, designed to enable the open web in the future. It uses the same core technology for Bitcoin and Blockchain. On this web, everything can be created from new currencies to new applications to new industries, opening the door to an entirely new future.
NEAR is a decentralized community-run cloud computing and storage platform, which is designed to enable the open web of the future. On this web, everything from new currencies to new applications to new industries can be created, opening the door to a brand new future.
NEAR is a scalable computing and storage platform with the potential to change how systems are designed, how applications are built and how the web itself works.
It is a complex technology allow developers and entrepreneurs to easily and sustainably build applications which reap the benefits of decentralization and participate in the Open Web while minimizing the associated costs for end users.
NEAR creates the only community-managed cloud that is strong enough to power the future of the open web, as NEAR is designed from the ground up to deliver intuitive experiences to
end users, expand capacity across millions of devices, and provide developers with new and sustainable business models for their applications.
The NEAR Platform uses a token — also called “NEAR”. This token allows the users of these cloud resources, regardless of where they are in the world, to fairly compensate the providers of the services and to ensure that these participants operate in good faith.

2.1 WHY NEAR?

Through focus, we find that Platforms based on blockchain technologies like Bitcoin and Ethereum have made great progress and enriched the world with thousands of innovative applications spanning from games to decentralized financing.
However, these original networks and none of the networks that followed were not able to bridge the gap towards mainstream adoption of the applications created above them and do not provide this type of standard that fully supports the web.
This is a result of two key factors:
  1. System design
  2. Organization design
System design is relevant because the technical architecture of other platforms creates substantial problems with both usability and scalability which have made adoption nearly impossible by any but the most technical innovators. End-users experience 97–99% dropoff rates when using applications and developers find the process of creating and maintaining their applications endlessly frustrating.
Fixing these problems requires substantial and complex changes to current protocol architectures, something which existing organizations haven’t proven capable of implementing. Instead, they create multi-year backlogs of specification design and implementation, which result in their technology falling further and further behind.
NEAR’s platform and organization are architected specifically to solve the above-mentioned problems. The technical design is fanatically focused on creating the world’s most usable and scalable decentralized platform so global-scale applications can achieve real adoption. The organization and governance structure are designed to rapidly ship and continuously evolve the protocol so it will never become obsolete.

2.1.1 Features, which address these problems:

1. USABILITY FIRST
The most important problem that needs to be addressed is how to allow developers to create useful applications that users can use easily and that will capture the sustainable value of these developers.
2. End-User Usability
Developers will only build applications, which their end users can actually use. NEAR’s “progressive security” model allows developers to create experiences for their users which more closely resemble familiar web experiences by delaying onboarding, removing the need for user to learn “blockchain” concepts and limiting the number of permission-asking interactions the user must have to use the application.
1. Simple Onboarding: NEAR allows developers to take actions on behalf of their users, which allows them to onboard users without requiring these users to provide a wallet or interact with tokens immediately upon reaching an application. Because accounts keep track of application-specific keys, user accounts can also be used for the kind of “Single Sign On” (SSO) functionality that users are familiar with from the traditional web (eg “Login with Facebook/Google/Github/etc”).
2. Easy Subscriptions: Contract-based accounts allow for easy creation of subscriptions and custom permissioning for particular applications.
3. Familiar Usage Styles: The NEAR economic model allows developers to pay for usage on behalf of their users in order to hide the costs of infrastructure in a way that is in line with familiar web usage paradigms.
4. Predictable Pricing: NEAR prices transactions on the platform in simple terms, which allow end-users to experience predictable pricing and less cognitive load when using the platform.

2.1.2 Design principles and development NEAR’s platform

1. Usability: Applications deployed to the platform should be seamless to use for end users and seamless to create for developers. Wherever possible, the underlying technology itself should fade to the background or be hidden completely from end users. Wherever possible, developers should use familiar languages and patterns during the development process. Basic applications should be intuitive and simple to create while applications that are more robust should still be secure.
2. Scalability: The platform should scale with no upper limit as long as there is economic justification for doing so in order to support enterprise-grade, globally used applications.
3. Sustainable Decentralization: The platform should encourage significant decentralization in both the short term and the long term in order to properly secure the value it hosts. The platform — and community — should be widely and permissionlessly inclusive and actively encourage decentralization and participation. To maintain sustainability, both technological and community governance mechanisms should allow for practical iteration while avoiding capture by any single parties in the end.
4. Simplicity: The design of each of the system’s components should be as simple as possible in order to achieve their primary purpose. Optimize for simplicity, pragmatism and ease of understanding above theoretical perfection.

2.2 HOW NEAR WORKS?

NEAR’s platform provides a community-operated cloud infrastructure for deploying and running decentralized applications. It combines the features of a decentralized database with others of a serverless compute platform. The token, which allows this platform to run also, enables applications built on top of it to interact with each other in new ways. Together, these features allow developers to create censorship resistant back-ends for applications that deal with high stakes data like money, identity, assets, and open-state components, which interact seamlessly with each other. These application back-ends and components are called “smart contracts,” though we will often refer to these all as simply “applications” here.
The infrastructure, which makes up this cloud, is created from a potentially infinite number of “nodes” run by individuals around the world who offer portions of their CPU and hard drive space — whether on their laptops or more professionally deployed servers. Developers write smart contracts and deploy them to this cloud as if they were deploying to a single server, which is a process that feels very similar to how applications are deployed to existing centralized clouds.
Once the developer has deployed an application, called a “smart contract”, and marked it unchangeable (“immutable”), the application will now run for as long as at least a handful of members of the NEAR community continue to exist. When end users interact with that deployed application, they will generally do so through a familiar web or mobile interface just like any one of a million apps today.
In the central cloud hosted by some companies today like: Amazon or Google, developers pay for their apps every month based on the amount of usage needed, for example based on the number of requests created by users visiting their webpages. The NEAR platform similarly requires that either users or developers provide compensation for their usage to the community operators of this infrastructure. Like today’s cloud infrastructure, NEAR prices usage based on easy to understand metrics that aren’t heavily influenced by factors like system congestion. Such factors make it very complicated for developers on alternative blockchain-based systems today.
In the centralized cloud, the controlling corporation makes decisions unilaterally. NEAR community-run cloud is decentralized so updates must ultimately be accepted by a sufficient quorum of the network participants. Updates about its future are generated from the community and subject to an inclusive governance process, which balances efficiency and security.
In order to ensure that the operators of nodes — who are anonymous and potentially even malicious — run the code with good behavior, they participate in a staking process called “Proof of Stake”. In this process, they willingly put a portion of value at risk as a sort of deposit, which they will forfeit if it is proven that they have operated improperly.

2.2.1 Elements of the NEAR’s Platform

The NEAR platform is made up of many separate elements. Some of these are native to the platform itself while others are used in conjunction with or on top of it.
1. THE NEAR TOKEN
NEAR token is the fundamental native asset of the NEAR ecosystem and its functionality is enabled for all accounts. Each token is a unique digital asset similar to Ether, which can be used to:
a) Pay the system for processing transactions and storing data.
b) Run a validating node as part of the network by participating in the staking process.
c) Help determine how network resources are allocated and where its future technical direction will go by participating in governance processes.
The NEAR token enables the economic coordination of all participants who operate the network plus it enables new behaviors among the applications which are built on top of that network.
2. OTHER DIGITAL ASSETS
The platform is designed to easily store unique digital assets, which may include, but aren’t limited to:
  • Other Tokens: Tokens bridged from other chains (“wrapped”) or created atop the NEAR Platform can be easily stored and moved using the underlying platform. This allows many kinds of tokens to be used atop the platform to pay for goods and services. “Stablecoins,” specific kinds of token which are designed to match the price of another asset (like the US Dollar), are particularly useful for transacting on the network in this way.
  • Unique Digital Assets: Similar to tokens, digital assets (sometimes called “Non Fungible Tokens” (NFTs) ranging from in-game collectibles to representations of real-world asset ownership can be stored and moved using the platform.
3. THE NEAR PLATFORM
The core platform, which is made up of the cloud of community-operated nodes, is the most basic piece of infrastructure provided. Developers can permissionlessly deploy smart contracts to this cloud and users can permissionlessly use the applications they power. Applications, which could range from consumer-facing games to digital currencies, can store their state (data) securely on the platform. This is conceptually similar to the Ethereum platform.
Operations that require an account, network use, or storage at the top of the platform require payment to the platform in the form of transaction fees that the platform then distributes to its community from the authentication contract. These operations could include creating new accounts, publishing new contracts, implementing code by contract and storing or modifying data by contract.
As long as the rules of the protocol are followed, any independent developer can write software, which interfaces with it (for example, by submitting transactions, creating accounts or even running a new node client) without asking for anyone’s permission first.
4. THE NEAR DEVELOPMENT SUITE
Set of tools and reference implementations created to facilitate its use by those developers and end users who prefer them. These tools include:
  • NEAR SDKs: NEAR platform supports (Rust and AssemblyScript) languages to write smart contracts. To provide a great experience for developers, NEAR has a full SDK, which includes standard data structures, examples and testing tools for these two languages.
  • Gitpod for NEAR: NEAR uses existing technology Gitpod to create zero time onboarding experience for developers. Gitpod provides an online “Integrated Development Environment” (IDE), which NEAR customized to allow developers to easily write, test and deploy smart contracts from a web browser.
  • NEAR Wallet: A wallet is a basic place for developers and end users to store the assets they need to use the network. NEAR Wallet is a reference implementation that is intended to work seamlessly with the progressive security model that lets application developers design more effective user experiences. It will eventually include built-in functionality to easily enable participation by holders in staking and governance processes on the network.
  • NEAR Explorer: To aid with both debugging of contracts and the understanding of network performance, Explorer presents information from the blockchain in an easily digestible web-based format.
  • NEAR Command Line Tools: The NEAR team provides a set of straightforward command line tools to allow developers to easily create, test and deploy applications from their local environments.
All of these tools are being created in an open-source manner so they can be modified or deployed by anyone.

3. ECONOMIC

Primarily economic forces drive the ecosystem, which makes up the NEAR platform. This economy creates the incentives, which allow participants permissionlessly organize to drive the platform’s key functions while creating strong disincentives for undesirable, irresponsible or malicious behavior. In order for the platform to be effective, these incentives need to exist both in the short term and in the long term.
The NEAR platform is a market among participants interested in two aspects:
  • On the supply side, certification contract operators and other core infrastructure must be motivated to provide these services that make up the community cloud.
  • On the demand side, platform developers and end-users who pay for their use need to be able to do so in a simple, clear and consistent way that helps them.
Further, economic forces can also be applied to support the ecosystem as a whole. They can be used at a micro level to create new business models by directly compensating the developers who create its most useful applications. They can also be used at a macro level by coordinating the efforts of a broader set of ecosystem participants who participate in everything from education to governance.

3.1 NEAR ECONOMY DESIGN PRINCIPLES

NEAR’s overall system design principles are used to inform its economic design according to the following interpretations:
1. Usability: End users and developers should have predictable and consistent pricing for their usage of the network. Users should never lose data forever.
2. Scalability: The platform should scale at economically justified thresholds.
3. Simplicity: The design of each of the system’s components should be as simple as possible in order to achieve their primary purpose.
4. Sustainable Decentralization: The barrier for participation in the platform as a validating node should be set as low as possible in order to bring a wide range of participants. Over time, their participation should not drive wealth and control into the hands of a small number. Individual transactions made far in the future must be at least as secure as those made today in order to safeguard the value they modify.

3.2 ECONOMIC OVERVIEW

The NEAR economy is optimized to provide developers and end users with the easiest possible experience while still providing proper incentives for network security and ecosystem development.
Summary of the key ideas that drive the system:
  • Thresholded Proof of Stake: Validating node operators provide scarce and valuable compute resources to the network. In order to ensure that the computations they run are correct, they are required to “stake” NEAR tokens, which guarantee their results. If these results are found to be inaccurate, the staker loses their tokens. This is a fundamental mechanism for securing the network. The threshold for participating in the system is set algorithmically at the lowest level possible to allow for the broadest possible participation of validating nodes in a given “epoch” period (½ of a day).
  • Epoch Rewards: Node operators are paid for their service a fixed percentage of total supply as a “security” fee of roughly 4.5% annualized. This rate targets sufficient participation levels among stakers in order to secure the network while balancing with other usage of NEAR token in the ecosystem.
  • Protocol treasury: In addition to validators, protocol treasury received a 0.5% of total supply annually to continuously re-invest into ecosystem development.
  • Transaction Costs: Usage of the network consumes two separate kinds of resources — instantaneous and long term. Instantaneous costs are generated by every transaction because each transaction requires the usage of both the network itself and some of its computation resources. These are priced together as a mostly-predictable cost per transaction, which is paid in NEAR tokens.
  • Storage Costs: Storage is a long term cost because storing data represents an ongoing burden to the nodes of the network. Storage costs are covered by maintaining minimum balance of NEAR tokens on the account or contract. This provides indirect mechanism of payment via inflation to validators for maintaining contract and account state on their nodes.
  • Inflation: Inflation is determined as combination of payouts to validators and protocol treasury minus the collected transaction fees and few other NEAR burning mechanics (like name auction). Overall the maximum inflation is 5%, which can go down over time as network gets more usage and more transactions fees are burned. It’s possible that inflation becomes negative (total supply decreases) if there is enough fees burned.
  • Scaling Thresholds: In a network, which scales its capacity relative to the amount of usage it receives, the thresholds, which drive the network to bring on additional capacity are economic in nature.
  • Security Thresholds: Some thresholds, which provide for good behavior among participants are set using economic incentives. For example, “Fishermen” (described separately).
Full Report
submitted by CoinEx_Institution to Coinex [link] [comments]

Delightful Privacy

Delightful Privacy delightful

This is a collection of software, operating systems, and other miscellaneous tools to help the average user fight for their privacy and security online.

Operating Systems

Fedora

Fedora uses Security-Enhanced Linux by default, which implements a variety of security policies, including mandatory access controls, which Fedora adopted early on. Fedora provides a hardening wrapper, and does hardening for all of its packages by using compiler features such as position-independent executable (PIE). Wikipedia

Pop!_OS

Pop!_OS provides full out-of-the-box support for both AMD and Nvidia GPUs. It is regarded as an easy distribution to set-up for gaming, mainly due to its built-in GPU support. Pop!_OS provides default disk encryption, streamlined window and workspace management, keyboard shortcuts for navigation as well as built in power management profiles. The latest releases also have packages that allow for easy setup for TensorFlow and CUDA. Wikipedia

Debian

Debian is one of the oldest operating systems based on the Linux kernel. The project is coordinated over the Internet by a team of volunteers guided by the Debian Project Leader and three foundational documents: the Debian Social Contract, the Debian Constitution, and the Debian Free Software Guidelines. New distributions are updated continually, and the next candidate is released after a time-based freeze. Wikipedia

openSUSE Tumbleweed - Rolling Release!

Any user who wishes to have the newest packages that include, but are not limited to, the Linux Kernel, SAMBA, git, desktops, office applications and many other packages, will want Tumbleweed. openSUSE

For enhanced security

Qubes OS

Qubes OS is a security-focused desktop operating system that aims to provide security through isolation. Virtualization is performed by Xen, and user environments can be based on Fedora, Debian, Whonix, and Microsoft Windows, among other operating systems. Wikipedia

Tails

Tails, or The Amnesic Incognito Live System, is a security-focused Debian-based Linux distribution aimed at preserving privacy and anonymity. All its incoming and outgoing connections are forced to go through Tor, and any non-anonymous connections are blocked. Wikipedia).*

Whonix

Whonix is a Debian GNU/Linux–based security-focused Linux distribution. It aims to provide privacy, security and anonymity on the internet. The operating system consists of two virtual machines, a "Workstation" and a Tor "Gateway", running Debian GNU/Linux. All communications are forced through the Tor network to accomplish this. Wikipedia

Web Browsers

For Desktop

Firefox Needs manual tweaking to be more secure! Use ghacks

Firefox, is a free and open-source web browser developed by the Mozilla Foundation and its subsidiary, the Mozilla Corporation. Wikipedia Recommended addons: uBlock Origin | Https Everywhere | Privacy Badger | Privacy Possum | Decentraleyes | NoScript | CanvasBlocker

Tor

Tor is free and open-source software for enabling anonymous communication. The name derived from the acronym for the original software project name "The Onion Router". Tor directs Internet traffic through a free, worldwide, volunteer overlay network consisting of more than seven thousand relays to conceal a user's location and usage from anyone conducting network surveillance or traffic analysis. Using Tor makes it more difficult to trace Internet activity to the user. Wikipedia

UnGoogled-Chromium

Without signing in to a Google Account, Chromium does pretty well in terms of security and privacy. However, Chromium still has some dependency on Google web services and binaries. In addition, Google designed Chromium to be easy and intuitive for users, which means they compromise on transparency and control of internal operations.
ungoogled-chromium addresses these issues in the following ways:

For mobile

Bromite Android Only

Bromite is a Chromium fork with ad blocking and privacy enhancements; take back your browser! Bromite

Firefox Focus Android - iOS

Firefox Focus is a free and open-source privacy-focused browser from Mozilla, available for Android and iOS. Wikipedia

Tor Browser for mobile Android - iOS

Tor protects your privacy on the internet by hiding the connection between your Internet address and the services you use. We believe Tor is reasonably secure, but please ensure you read the instructions and configure it properly. GitHub

Email

Tutanota

Tutanota is an end-to-end encrypted email software and freemium hosted secure email service. Wikipedia

Mailbox

There are many ears listening on the Internet, which is why all our services require mandatory SSL/TLS-encrypted data transmission. For additional security, we also use enhanced (green) security certificates ("EV") by the independent SwissSign trust service provider from Switzerland (Check the padlock symbol in your web browser's URL field). But this is just the beginning – there is so much more that we do. Mailbox

Disroot

Disroot is a decentralized cloud-based service that allows you to store your files and communicate with one another. Established by a privacy-focused organization of volunteers, if we look at Disroot as an email provider specifically, it stands out thanks to its emphasis on security with a completly free open-source approach. ProPrivacy

ProtonMail

ProtonMail is an end-to-end encrypted email service founded in 2013 in Geneva, Switzerland by scientists who met at the CERN research facility. ProtonMail uses client-side encryption to protect email content and user data before they are sent to ProtonMail servers, unlike other common email providers such as Gmail and Outlook.com. The service can be accessed through a webmail client, the Tor network, or dedicated iOS and Android apps. Wikipedia

Search Engine

Searx

searx is a free metasearch engine, available under the GNU Affero General Public License version 3, with the aim of protecting the privacy of its users. To this end, searx does not share users' IP addresses or search history with the search engines from which it gathers results. Tracking cookies served by the search engines are blocked, preventing user-profiling-based results modification. By default, searx queries are submitted via HTTP POST, to prevent users' query keywords from appearing in webserver logs. Wikipedia - Find public instances of searx here searx.space

Startpage

Startpage is a web search engine that highlights privacy as its distinguishing feature. Previously, it was known as the metasearch engine Ixquick, At that time, Startpage was a variant service. Both sites were merged in 2016. Wikipedia

YaCy

YaCy is a free distributed search engine, built on principles of peer-to-peer (P2P) networks. Its core is a computer program written in Java distributed on several hundred computers, as of September 2006, so-called YaCy-peers. Each YaCy-peer independently crawls through the Internet, analyzes and indexes found web pages, and stores indexing results in a common database (so called index) which is shared with other YaCy-peers using principles of P2P networks. It is a free search engine that everyone can use to build a search portal for their intranet and to help search the public internet clearly. Wikipedia

VPN

If you need anonymity and privacy online use Tor instead, if you are looking to bypass a geo-restriction, don't trust public WiFi, or are looking to Torrent, a VPN will help you.

Mullvad

Mullvad is an open-source commercial virtual private network (VPN) service based in Sweden. Launched in March 2009, Mullvad operates using the WireGuard and OpenVPN protocols. Mullvad accepts Bitcoin and Bitcoin Cash for subscriptions in addition to conventional payment methods.
No email address or other identifying information is requested during Mullvad's registration process. Rather, a unique 16-digit account number is anonymously generated for each new user. This account number is henceforth used to log in to the Mullvad service.
The TechRadar review notes that "The end result of all this is you don't have to worry about how Mullvad handles court requests to access your usage data, because, well, there isn't any." Wikipedia

ProtonVPN

ProtonVPN utilizes OpenVPN (UDP/TCP) and the IKEv2 protocol, with AES-256 encryption. The company has a strict no-logging policy for user connection data, and also prevents DNS and Web-RTC leaks from exposing users' true IP addresses. ProtonVPN also includes Tor access support and a kill switch to shut off Internet access in the event of a lost VPN connection.
In January 2020, ProtonVPN became the first VPN provider to release its source code on all platforms and conduct an independent security audit. ProtonVPN is the only VPN to do so, even though experts say this is a crucial factor in deciding whether to trust a VPN service. Wikipedia

For information about alternatives to software and services.

If you are looking for alternatives to proprietary services like Discord and Facebook, or an open-source alternative to Photoshop, check out our list about Awesome-Alternatives

Mirrors are kept up to date, this post may lag behind as we add stuff in.

submitted by CipherOps to LinuxCafe [link] [comments]

PDQ Deploy packs v72.0.0 (2020-09-18)

Background

This is v72.0.0 (v71.0.0, v70.0.0, v69.0.0, etc...) of our PDQ installers and includes all installers from the previous package with old versions removed.
All packages:
  1. ...install silently and don't place desktop or quicklaunch shortcuts
  2. ...disable all auto-update, nag popup and stat-collection/telemetry "features" possible
  3. ...work with the free or paid version of PDQ Deploy but do not require it - each package can run standalone (e.g. from a thumb drive) or pushed with SCCM/GPO/etc if desired. PM me if you need assistance setting something like that up

Download

Primary:
Download the torrent.
Secondary: Download the self-extracting archive from one of the repos:
Mirror HTTPS HTTP Location Host
Official link link US-NY SGC-Hosting
#1 link link FR mxmod
Tertiary:
Plug one of these keys into Resilio Sync (formerly called "BT Sync") to pull down that repository:
- BTRSRPF7Y3VWFRBG64VUDGP7WIIVNTR4Q (Installer Packages, ~2.25 GB) - BMHHALGV7WLNSAPIPYDP5DU3NDNSM5XNC (WSUS Offline updates, ~12.00 GB) 
Make sure the settings for your Sync folder look like this (or this if you're on v1.3.x). Specifically you need to enable DHT.
Quaternary: (source code)
The Github page contains all scripts and wrapper files used in the pack. Check it out if you want to see the code without downloading the full binary pack, or just steal them for your own use. Note that downloading from Github directly won't work - you need either this provided pack or go manually fetch all the binaries yourself in order to just plug them in and start working.

Pack list

Installers:
(Updates in bold. All installers are 64-bit unless otherwise marked)
  • 7-Zip v19.00
  • 7-Zip v19.00 (x86)
  • Adobe Acrobat Reader DC v20.012.20041
  • Adobe AIR v32.0.0.125
  • Adobe Flash Player v32.0.0.433 (Chrome)
  • Adobe Flash Player v32.0.0.433 (Firefox)
  • Adobe Flash Player v32.0.0.433 (IE / ActiveX)
  • Apple iTunes v12.5.1.21
  • CDBurnerXP v4.5.8.7128
  • FileZilla Client v3.50.0
  • Gimp v2.10.20 (x86)
  • Google Chrome Enterprise v85.0.4183.102
  • Google Chrome Enterprise v85.0.4183.102 (x86)
  • Google Earth Pro v7.3.3
  • Java Development Kit 8 Update 261
  • Java Development Kit 8 Update 261 (x86)
  • Java Development Kit 11.0.7
  • Java Runtime 8 update 261
  • Java Runtime 8 update 261 (x86)
  • Java Runtime 10.0.2
  • KTS KypM Telnet/SSH Server v1.19c (x86)
  • LibreOffice v7.0.1
  • Microsoft .NET Framework v3.5.1 SP1 (x86)
  • Microsoft Silverlight v5.1.50918.0
  • Mozilla Firefox v80.0.1
  • Mozilla Firefox v80.0.1 (x86)
  • Mozilla Firefox ESR v68.12.0
  • Mozilla Firefox ESR v68.12.0 (x86)
  • Mozilla Thunderbird v78.2.2 (x86) (customized; read notes)
  • Notepad++ v7.8.9 (x86)
  • Pale Moon v28.13.0
  • Pale Moon v28.13.0 (x86)
  • Spark v2.9.2 (x86)
  • TightVNC v2.8.27
  • TightVNC v2.8.27 (x86)
  • UltraVNC v1.2.4.0 (x86)
  • VLC media player v3.0.11
  • WinSCP v5.17.7 (x86)
Utilities:
  • Clean Up ALL Printers (purge all printers from target)
  • Clean Up Orphaned Printers (remove non-existent printers from the spooler)
  • Empty All Recycle Bins (force all recycle bins to empty on target)
  • Enable Remote Desktop
  • Install PKI Certificates
  • Reboot (force target reboot in 15 seconds)
  • Remove Adobe Flash Player (removes all versions)
  • Remove Java Runtime (removes JRE versions 3-11 using all means necessary)
  • Remove Microsoft Silverlight (removes all versions of Silverlight)
  • Temp File Cleanup
  • USB Device Cleanup. Uninstalls non-present USB hubs, USB storage devices and their storage volumes, Disks, CD-ROM's, Floppies, WPD devices and deletes their registry items. Devices will re-initialize at next connection

Instructions

  1. Import all .XML files from the \job files directory into PDQ deploy (it should look roughly like this after you've imported them).
  2. Copy all files from the \repository directory to wherever your repository is.
  3. All jobs reference PDQ's $(Repository) variable, so make sure it's set in preferences.

Package Notes

  1. Read the notes in the PDQ interface for each package, they explain exactly what that installer does. Basically, most packages use a .bat file to accomplish multi-step installs with the free version of PDQ. You can edit the batch files to see what they do; most just delete "All Users" desktop shortcuts and things like that. changelog-v##-updated-.txt has version and release history in addition to random notes where I complain about things like Reader DC and how much of a pain it is to build packages for.
  2. Thunderbird:
    • Thunderbird is configured to use a global config file stored on a network share. This allows for settings changes en masse. By default it's set to check for config updates every 120 minutes.
    • You can change the config location, update frequency, OR disable this behavior entirely by editing thunderbird-custom-settings.js.
    • A copy of the config file is in the Thunderbird directory and is called thunderbird-global-settings.js
    • If you don't want any customizations, just edit Thunderbird's .bat file and comment out or delete all the lines mentioning the custom config files.
  3. Microsoft Offline Updates - built using the excellent WSUS Offline tool. Please donate to them if you can, their team does excellent work.

Integrity

In the folder \integrity verification the file checksums.txt is signed with my PGP key (0x07d1490f82a211a2, pubkey included). You can use this to verify package integrity.
If you find a bug or glitch, PM me or post it here. Advice and comments are welcome and appreciated.

Donations

These packs will always be free and open-source. If you feel like giving away your hard-earned cash to random strangers on the internet you may do so here:
Patreon
Bitcoin: 1Bfxpo1WqTGwRXZKrwYZV2zvJ4ggyj9GE1
Monero (preferred):
46ZUK4VDLLz3zapDw62UaS71ZfFBjH9uwhc8FeyocPhUHHsuxj5zfvpZpZcZFHWpxoXD99MVt6PnR9QfftXDV8s6CFAnPSo
"Do not withhold good from those to whom it is due, when it is in your power to act."
submitted by vocatus to sysadmin [link] [comments]

PDQ Deploy packs v72.0.0 (2020-09-18)

Background

This is v72.0.0 (v71.0.0, v70.0.0, v69.0.0, etc...) of our PDQ installers and includes all installers from the previous package with old versions removed.
All packages:
  1. ...install silently and don't place desktop or quicklaunch shortcuts
  2. ...disable all auto-update, nag popup and stat-collection/telemetry "features" possible
  3. ...work with the free or paid version of PDQ Deploy but do not require it - each package can run standalone (e.g. from a thumb drive) or pushed with SCCM/GPO/etc if desired. PM me if you need assistance setting something like that up

Download

Primary:
Download the torrent.
Secondary: Download the self-extracting archive from one of the repos:
Mirror HTTPS HTTP Location Host
Official link link US-NY SGC-Hosting
#1 link link FR mxmod
Tertiary:
Plug one of these keys into Resilio Sync (formerly called "BT Sync") to pull down that repository:
- BTRSRPF7Y3VWFRBG64VUDGP7WIIVNTR4Q (Installer Packages, ~2.25 GB) - BMHHALGV7WLNSAPIPYDP5DU3NDNSM5XNC (WSUS Offline updates, ~12.00 GB) 
Make sure the settings for your Sync folder look like this (or this if you're on v1.3.x). Specifically you need to enable DHT.
Quaternary: (source code)
The Github page contains all scripts and wrapper files used in the pack. Check it out if you want to see the code without downloading the full binary pack, or just steal them for your own use. Note that downloading from Github directly won't work - you need either this provided pack or go manually fetch all the binaries yourself in order to just plug them in and start working.

Pack list

Installers:
(Updates in bold. All installers are 64-bit unless otherwise marked)
  • 7-Zip v19.00
  • 7-Zip v19.00 (x86)
  • Adobe Acrobat Reader DC v20.012.20041
  • Adobe AIR v32.0.0.125
  • Adobe Flash Player v32.0.0.433 (Chrome)
  • Adobe Flash Player v32.0.0.433 (Firefox)
  • Adobe Flash Player v32.0.0.433 (IE / ActiveX)
  • Apple iTunes v12.5.1.21
  • CDBurnerXP v4.5.8.7128
  • FileZilla Client v3.50.0
  • Gimp v2.10.20 (x86)
  • Google Chrome Enterprise v85.0.4183.102
  • Google Chrome Enterprise v85.0.4183.102 (x86)
  • Google Earth Pro v7.3.3
  • Java Development Kit 8 Update 261
  • Java Development Kit 8 Update 261 (x86)
  • Java Development Kit 11.0.7
  • Java Runtime 8 update 261
  • Java Runtime 8 update 261 (x86)
  • Java Runtime 10.0.2
  • KTS KypM Telnet/SSH Server v1.19c (x86)
  • LibreOffice v7.0.1
  • Microsoft .NET Framework v3.5.1 SP1 (x86)
  • Microsoft Silverlight v5.1.50918.0
  • Mozilla Firefox v80.0.1
  • Mozilla Firefox v80.0.1 (x86)
  • Mozilla Firefox ESR v68.12.0
  • Mozilla Firefox ESR v68.12.0 (x86)
  • Mozilla Thunderbird v78.2.2 (x86) (customized; read notes)
  • Notepad++ v7.8.9 (x86)
  • Pale Moon v28.13.0
  • Pale Moon v28.13.0 (x86)
  • Spark v2.9.2 (x86)
  • TightVNC v2.8.27
  • TightVNC v2.8.27 (x86)
  • UltraVNC v1.2.4.0 (x86)
  • VLC media player v3.0.11
  • WinSCP v5.17.7 (x86)
Utilities:
  • Clean Up ALL Printers (purge all printers from target)
  • Clean Up Orphaned Printers (remove non-existent printers from the spooler)
  • Empty All Recycle Bins (force all recycle bins to empty on target)
  • Enable Remote Desktop
  • Install PKI Certificates
  • Reboot (force target reboot in 15 seconds)
  • Remove Adobe Flash Player (removes all versions)
  • Remove Java Runtime (removes JRE versions 3-11 using all means necessary)
  • Remove Microsoft Silverlight (removes all versions of Silverlight)
  • Temp File Cleanup
  • USB Device Cleanup. Uninstalls non-present USB hubs, USB storage devices and their storage volumes, Disks, CD-ROM's, Floppies, WPD devices and deletes their registry items. Devices will re-initialize at next connection

Instructions

  1. Import all .XML files from the \job files directory into PDQ deploy (it should look roughly like this after you've imported them).
  2. Copy all files from the \repository directory to wherever your repository is.
  3. All jobs reference PDQ's $(Repository) variable, so make sure it's set in preferences.

Package Notes

  1. Read the notes in the PDQ interface for each package, they explain exactly what that installer does. Basically, most packages use a .bat file to accomplish multi-step installs with the free version of PDQ. You can edit the batch files to see what they do; most just delete "All Users" desktop shortcuts and things like that. changelog-v##-updated-.txt has version and release history in addition to random notes where I complain about things like Reader DC and how much of a pain it is to build packages for.
  2. Thunderbird:
    • Thunderbird is configured to use a global config file stored on a network share. This allows for settings changes en masse. By default it's set to check for config updates every 120 minutes.
    • You can change the config location, update frequency, OR disable this behavior entirely by editing thunderbird-custom-settings.js.
    • A copy of the config file is in the Thunderbird directory and is called thunderbird-global-settings.js
    • If you don't want any customizations, just edit Thunderbird's .bat file and comment out or delete all the lines mentioning the custom config files.
  3. Microsoft Offline Updates - built using the excellent WSUS Offline tool. Please donate to them if you can, their team does excellent work.

Integrity

In the folder \integrity verification the file checksums.txt is signed with my PGP key (0x07d1490f82a211a2, pubkey included). You can use this to verify package integrity.
If you find a bug or glitch, PM me or post it here. Advice and comments are welcome and appreciated.

Donations

These packs will always be free and open-source. If you feel like giving away your hard-earned cash to random strangers on the internet you may do so here:
Patreon
Bitcoin: 1Bfxpo1WqTGwRXZKrwYZV2zvJ4ggyj9GE1
Monero (preferred):
46ZUK4VDLLz3zapDw62UaS71ZfFBjH9uwhc8FeyocPhUHHsuxj5zfvpZpZcZFHWpxoXD99MVt6PnR9QfftXDV8s6CFAnPSo
"Do not withhold good from those to whom it is due, when it is in your power to act."
submitted by vocatus to pdq [link] [comments]

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